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All Upfront Blog

  • Monitor grapples with gender balance in sourcing

    Women have a lot to say – across business, politics, economics, education – you name it. But are their voices always heard?

  • A legacy worth defending

    There is a discovery that was made in the 20th century that is often overlooked. It is the legacy of nonviolence left by Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., and Nelson Mandela.

  • From one book lover to many others

    Our Monitor Facebook book group is utterly vibrant – enthusiastic readers sharing book tips with one another, asking and answering book questions of all kinds. 

  • The marches that have shaped America

    A wave of progressive movements, driven by decades of swelling unrest among women and minority groups, crested in 1968. It was a show of activism, both peaceful and violent, that the nation hasn’t seen since. At least, not until now.

  • When the CEO lives around the corner

    When I traveled to Wausau, Wis., where the unemployment rate is a full percentage point below the national rate, I admit a few preconceptions crept in. What I didn’t expect to find was the power that comes when the biggest employers are locally owned.

  • The poets who bring us something more

    From literary prizes to at-work book clubs to poetry slams, Clevelanders are uniquely leveraging the written and spoken word as a tool for progress. To some, it offers a voice. To others, it offers a mirror for introspection.

  • The largest patriotism

    On July 4, which marks Independence Day in the United States, it is worth noting how America has helped reshape the idea of what patriotism is.

  • The Monitor’s collaboration with the Energy Foundation

    The Energy Foundation has given a grant to support the Monitor’s distinctive approach to climate change coverage.

  • Nigeria’s schoolgirl rebellion

    In the borderlands of Nigeria, school attendance for girls is as much an act of war against Boko Haram as picking up a gun.

  • Global voices on progress: a special project of the Monitor Daily

    This summer, the Monitor is collaborating with more than 50 newspapers worldwide to promote solutions journalism – and a more hopeful view of the world. 

  • Breaking the cycle of absentee fatherhood

    Lee began to understand the true nature of fatherhood when he began to understand the true nature of marriage, even though he wasn’t married himself.

  • The costs of liberty

    Peng Jie came to Beijing for the same reason rural migrants have come to cities for generations – to find opportunity and a new life. And she did. The problem was that her community was seen as a blight on the gleaming vision for a modern Beijing.

  • When a healthy environment is good business

    Dredging a swath through the Varadero reef would increase trade, create jobs, and drive down prices of some goods for Colombians. How do you weigh the value of a potentially unique ecosystem against the promise of greater prosperity and meaningful employment?

  • How to change Washington

    Washington isn’t working, the thinking goes. But what if that sentiment is wrong? What if Washington is working pretty much as it is set up to do?

  • Can the Arctic teach the world to cooperate?

    Must exploitation and conflict inevitably accompany exploration and expansion? Or can we learn the lessons of the past and reap the benefits of expansion without falling prey to its temptations?

  • Finding the good beyond the crisis

    By most metrics, Puerto Rico is not a success story. Yet Whitney’s story points to why it is too simplistic to look only at the negative – or only at the positive.

  • How progress drives purification

    Staff writer Ryan Lenora Brown had gone to Cape Town, South Africa, to report on “Zero Day” – the day the city’s faucets were going to go dry because of drought. But there had been a development.

  • Where maple syrup meets global economics

    The recent upheaval in Western democracies has several causes, but perhaps the greatest is this: How are they coming to terms with their shifting role in the global economy?

  • To improve the world, enlist girls, too

    Like other girls in her south Indian village, Kousalya Radakrishnan was told to stay at home, marry young, and have lots of babies. If she and a number of her teenage friends had listened, her village would have worse sanitation, fewer library books, and no streetlights.

  • A different definition of violence

    How do you rein in hateful speech online without overbalancing into censorship? That is Germany’s challenge.