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Rethink the News
IN THE NEWS

What we're watching today

Here's a glimpse at our top five stories, including editor commentary on each story, and a sample of our audio edition. You can test drive one edition before you’re asked to subscribe.

Daily Audio Edition

An excerpt from The Christian Science Monitor Daily Audio Edition

July
26
Issue
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About Monitor Journalism

We think it is time to rethink the news.

News is essential. It is the fuel for a thriving democracy. It takes us to places and introduces us to people we never imagined. It defends our rights and values.

Over the Monitor’s 108-year history, we’ve built a legacy of high-quality, distinctive journalism because we recognize that news is more than facts. It’s the story of how we are each trying to make our homes, communities, and nations better. What matters are the values and ideals that drive us, not just the who, what, when, and where of the news.

When we understand that, we understand the world, and one another, better.

The Monitor gives readers that deeper insight by offering this approach to readers:

We challenge conventional thinking. As forces from politics to social media try to break us into competing tribes – political, racial, or economic – together we’ll rethink the question, “Who is my neighbor?”

We listen to you. We need you to hold us accountable – to keep us honest and grounded. To inspire us with what inspires you. Together, we can build a community of people who ask more from news.

We will change how you see news. News must be accurate and trustworthy, but facts alone can miss the whole story – the story of us. We are much better than much of today’s news portrays us to be. We will have the courage to look into both the best and the worst in us – and not to blame, but to demand better.

Journalism can be a force for good – for inspiration and progress. But only if we all make it so.

Special Projects
  • Madagascar fights the subtler side of hunger: chronic malnutrition

    Droughts and famines tend to afflict countries in cyclical fashion. But where chronic malnutrition is endemic, such as in Madagascar, they strike harder. Health education is a start, aid groups say – but adjusting priorities is important, too. Part 3 of our series on famine resilience.

  • Madagascar skirted famine – barely. Now, it's boosting resilience before drought returns.

    Where persistent drought is the new normal, communities will have to adapt – a challenge across eastern Africa. But Madagascar’s success, and the lessons that it learned from its brush with disaster, point to how crises might be averted elsewhere. Part 2 of our series on famine resilience.

  • In Ethiopia, model drought defenses are put to the test

    The country's booming capital, Addis Ababa, sits in stark contrast to rural areas struggling against two severe droughts in three years. But innovative aid has helped farming communities manage the crisis. Part 1 of our series on famine resilience.

  • Meet a new breed of prosecutor

    From Texas to Florida to Illinois, many of these young prosecutors are eschewing the death penalty, talking rehabilitation as much as punishment, and often refusing to charge people for minor offenses. While their numbers are small, they are taking over DA offices at a crucial moment.

  • How Cleveland has become a leader in trying to eradicate human trafficking

    Behind various efforts by the heartland city are a few individuals who are striving to chip away at a problem that many experts believe receives too little attention in society.

  • Ambassadors of smoke

    Southern-style barbecue is spreading around the world, turning weekend grillers into would-be pitmasters. Meet a real baron of barbecue – ‘Big Moe.’