All Global Issues

  • International Women's Day: What's it all about?

    International Women's Day: What's it all about?

    Today is the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day. In 1911 – the year the holiday was first celebrated internationally – women could not yet vote in most countries. Now, a number of women serve as presidents and in other positions of power. But there’s still more to do if women are to enjoy the same access and rights as men, say International Women’s Day organizers and the UN. This year’s focus? "Equal access to education, training, and science and technology: Pathway to decent work for women.” Read on to find out more about International Women’s Day.

  • People-powered democratic revolts - do they last?

    People-powered democratic revolts - do they last?

    Analyzing a selection of political revolutions - successful and not - around the globe since World War II

  • The slap heard round the world

  • Swiss freeze Qaddafi assets: How dictators stash their cash 101

    Swiss freeze Qaddafi assets: How dictators stash their cash 101

    Switzerland froze the assets of Libya strongman Muammar Qaddafi and 26 other people from his entourage, less than two weeks after freezing assets belonging to Egypt's Hosni Mubarak.

  • How dictators stash their cash 101: Qaddafi, Mubarak, and others

    How dictators stash their cash 101: Qaddafi, Mubarak, and others

    Muammar Qaddafi and Hosni Mubarak are both said to be worth billions of dollars. 'Hiding money is not rocket science,' says Jeffrey Robinson, author of a money laundering exposé.

  • How dictators stash their cash 101: Egypt, Libya not alone in losing assets

    Switzerland says it has returned more than $1.5 billion over the past 20 years, but money laundering continues on a grand scale. 'It's like untying the Gordian knot,' says a former Department of Justice official.

  • How dictators stash their cash 101: How can Egypt track stolen assets?

    A first step is identifying where assets are held. Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi is said to have billions stashed in bank accounts from Dubai to Switzerland.

  • Sanction Qaddafi? How 5 nations have reacted to sanctions.

    Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi is earning widespread condemnation for his brutal tactics against a populist uprising. As the international community wrestles with how best to show their disapproval, one suggested option is imposing sanctions – a step French President Nicolas Sarkozy urged the European Union to take. But their effectiveness is hotly contested. Here’s a look at how useful sanctions have been in changing the behavior of other nations.

  • Prince William and Kate Middleton royal wedding: Do monarchies still matter?

    Prince William and Kate Middleton royal wedding: Do monarchies still matter?

    Prince William and Kate Middleton's royal wedding may have tinges of the turreted-castle fairy tale. But from romantic to ruthless, more than 40 modern monarchies, including Prince William's family, still influence global realities for better or worse.

  • World's top 5 economies: Most Americans already think China is No. 1

    World's top 5 economies: Most Americans already think China is No. 1

    It's official. On Feb. 14, China was recognized as the world's second-largest economy after the United States. Japan released its 2010 economic figures, announcing that its full-year GDP was $5.47 trillion – about 7 percent smaller than China's. But read between the lines and look beyond the top three rankings. You find that Americans are already convinced that the US has fallen behind China, that Japanese are not necessarily dismayed at the news that they've fallen to No. 3, and that other nations are showing notable economic changes.

  • Hosni Mubarak's exit plan: Where do exiled leaders go?

    Hosni Mubarak's exit plan: Where do exiled leaders go?

    With Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak appearing to be headed out of office, it’s likely he has thought about where he’d head next if he’s forced out of the country as well as the presidency. Ousted world leaders have a history of slipping away to other countries and living a life of relative anonymity and leisure in exile. If President Mubarak joins the ranks of those who fled their countries to live out the rest of their days elsewhere, where will he go? Some of his predecessors’ choices could give some guidance.

  • Rising global food prices squeeze the world's poor

    Rising global food prices squeeze the world's poor

    Weather, inflation, and biofuels pushed the United Nations food price index to an all-time high in December, sparking concern over the poor being left with empty plates.

  • South Sudan set to join ranks of five of the world's newest countries

    South Sudan set to join ranks of five of the world's newest countries

    The South Sudan referendum ended with an overwhelming vote for independence – 99.57 percent of those polled voted for it – and put the region officially on track to become independent in July. How often is a country born? (Or wrested from territory of an already existing one?) Here’s a look at five of the most recent declarations of independence:

  • Hunger and food security: Is Africa selling the farm?

    Hunger and food security: Is Africa selling the farm?

    Foreign investors see Africa as a breadbasket. Done well, investment could help with African hunger but create food security for the rest of the world.

  • Hunger and food security: One way to create an African breadbasket

    Hunger and food security: One way to create an African breadbasket

    Foreign investment in a Zambian farming firm may be a business model for Africa's hunger and food security problems.

  • Nine countries in the Middle East where 'winds of change' are blowing

    Nine countries in the Middle East where 'winds of change' are blowing

    Those who said that "winds of change" were blowing through the Middle East were right. The past few weeks have seen a series of political shifts in response to widespread discontent and popular opposition that once went unacknowledged. On Friday, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak ceded to protesters in Cairo and stepped down. As Egyptians' cries, first of anger and now of jubilation, beam into living rooms throughout the Middle East, here is a look at where those "winds of change" are taking us. (Editor's note: This is an updated version of a story that originally ran on Feb. 2)

  • How 5 revolutions got their names

    Questions are cropping up about the appropriateness of calling Tunisia's uprising the "Jasmine Revolution" – stemming from the fact that the term has been used in reference to Syria in 2005 and even the path that brought ousted Tunisian President Ben Ali to power. But the moniker could stick, at least partially because it's become a tradition of sorts to name the revolutions of the 2000s after colors and flowers and even household items. Here's an overview of some of the popular revolutions – and their nicknames – that preceded Tunisia's ... whatever you want to call it:

  • How retirement is being reinvented worldwide

    How retirement is being reinvented worldwide

    People are working longer – out of necessity and choice – as the world undergoes one of the biggest demographic shifts in history.

  • Arizona shooting: US has lots of guns, but it's not alone

    Arizona shooting: US has lots of guns, but it's not alone

    The shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D) of Arizona has brought renewed attention to the US 'gun culture' and gun violence – and the prevalence of guns in the country. In fact, the US has the largest number of civilian-owned guns in the world, both in raw number and relative to its total population, according to a 2007 report by Small Arms Survey, a Geneva-based project that studies small arms and armed violence. But some countries aren't too far behind the US. Below are some of the countries with the largest civilian gun ownership rates in the world.

  • Haiti earthquake anniversary: the state of global disaster relief

    Haiti earthquake anniversary: the state of global disaster relief

    On the first anniversary of the Haiti earthquake, global disaster relief is under the microscope. A $15-billion-a-year industry with 250,000 workers, the stakes are high – but from each tsunami, quake, hurricane, and drought, we learn what works and what doesn't.