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Commentary The Monitor's View

  • Britain’s audit of injustice

    A society’s first step to reduce inequality is to make sure government provides services without bigotry. Britain’s new prime minister is trying a novel approach: an audit of government injustice.

  • Who says voters are ‘polarized’?

    A study of voters who read news articles about political polarization finds they tend to soften their views. Democracy relies less on division than a respect among fellow citizens.

  • How humility won Colombia’s peace deal

    As Colombians prepare to vote on a carefully crafted peace proposal that would end a long war, they must remember how each side in the talks had to learn humility, helped along by a focus on those who suffered most in the war.

  • Muslims and Europe, swimming chic by chic

    Bans in France on wearing ‘burkini’ swimwear only alienates Muslims. Europe must find better ways to encourage integration, not feed into Islamic State’s playbook.

  • A jihadist’s cultural redemption

    A former leader in an Al Qaeda affiliate admits guilt – and regret – in a world court for destroying ancient artifacts in Timbuktu, Mali. His advice to jihadists: Save all of humanity’s cherished culture rather than destroy it.

  • Pulling kids from war’s rubble

    Global reaction to children in conflicts – as soldiers, refugees, or among the injured – has improved as more nations presume innocence for the youngest and most vulnerable.

  • A new approach to ending terrorism

    In a TV speech, Morocco’s king appeals to the millions of Moroccans living in the West to counter the false arguments of Islamic State that might appeal to disaffected young Muslims and lead them to violent acts.

  • Fishing for peace in Asian waters

    A court ruling against China’s claims on islands has helped fuel military tensions in Asia. To get off the path to conflict, the region must pursue its common interests, starting with fisheries.

  • Kids today, what do they know? Turns out, a lot

    Fewer young people are engaging in risky behavior than only a quarter century ago. Why this moral shift in the next generation?

August 28, 2016

Photos of the weekend

A reveler takes part in the Holi Party Festival at Niemeyer Center in Aviles, northern Spain, Saturday.

More The Monitor's View
  • The National Parks at 100

    Americans agree that these special places hold immense value. But how to pay to preserve them remains a challenge.

  • Music can soothe a sultry summer

    Joining others in song or dance may lift one’s sense of well-being, a recent study suggests. So sing (or dance) on.

  • For Africa, a lesson about identity politics

    Voters in South Africa gave the ruling African National Congress a sharp rebuke for presuming it can be reelected as the natural leader of the black majority. The ANC must return to Nelson Mandela’s goal of a nonracial society with equal opportunities.

  • What’s not a game in Rio Olympics

    As host to the 2016 Games, Brazil hopes to both rebrand itself abroad and improve its own society. The Games remain a force for good, and each Olympics leaves its own legacy.

  • A leap for Japan’s women – and its economy

    Tokyo elected its first female governor, another sign of Japan’s slow progress to revive the economy by encouraging more women in the workplace.

  • Alabama can lead by rejecting a lottery

    As one of the few states without a lottery, Alabama may soon vote to start one as a revenue fix for a fiscal fiasco. Yet national data show lotteries are a tax on the poor. States can’t rely on faith in luck when they must invest in talent.

  • Britain’s answer to angry voters

    As in the US election campaign, British voters showed their dislike of globalization in opting out of the European Union. Now a new prime minister seeks to restore trust in globalization’s prime agents: corporations.

  • A Norway gift that would move mountains

    To honor Finland’s independence anniversary, Norway may give it a mountain peak along their border. The gift, while a small gesture, symbolizes a kind of peace that may keep land-grabbing bully nations at bay. 

  • The Fed’s search for breakout growth

    America’s central bank, like other big financial institutions, seeks fresh ideas to end the ‘new normal’ of mediocre economic growth. Breaking up old models is a good first step.

  • Islamic State’s failing ‘war of religion’

    After Islamic State claimed credit for the killing of a French Catholic priest, leaders of major faiths gathered to counter this attempt to incite Muslims and Christians against each other. Peace is the norm between religions.

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