All Global Issues

  • How NATO-Russia talks on missile defense could halt – or launch – a new arms race

    How NATO-Russia talks on missile defense could halt – or launch – a new arms race

    Some security experts say the most urgent quest of our time is convincing Moscow to allow the US to defend the West with a missile defense shield.

  • Cancún climate change deal falls flat, Kyoto Protocol on life support

    Cancún climate change deal falls flat, Kyoto Protocol on life support

    Two weeks of Cancún climate change talks ended Saturday, with a vague deal to help poor countries deal with climate change and the original Kyoto Protocol all but dead.

  • North Korea and Iran: How the two states test US diplomacy

    North Korea and Iran: How the two states test US diplomacy

    North Korea is seen as an unpredictable 'spoiled child.' Iran is seen as a rational but aggressive nation. Each have nuclear programs, but pose unique problems for US security.

  • North Korea: Cold-war legacy

    North Korea: Cold-war legacy

  • Iran's steady anti-Western stance

    Iran's steady anti-Western stance

  • Cybercrime Cyberattacks Q&A: 'World of pain' for those who don't support WikiLeaks

    Gregg Housh, an unofficial spokesman for Anonymous, explains how the hactivist collective's voluntary botnet was powerful enough to bring down Visa and MasterCard websites.

  • WikiLeaks cyberattacks Q&A: MasterCard and Visa 'have egg on their faces.'

    Security WikiLeaks cyberattacks Q&A: MasterCard and Visa 'have egg on their faces.'

    'MasterCard died quick,' Gregg Housh, an unofficial spokesman for the hactivists known as Anonymous, says in an interview with the Monitor. 'Visa went down in 30 seconds.'

  • Hackers wage global 'cyberwar' in defense of WikiLeaks

    Hackers wage global 'cyberwar' in defense of WikiLeaks

    Anonymous hackers are rallying behind Julian Assange, declaring 'cyberwar' on governments and companies that have stopped doing business with WikiLeaks.

  • Hackers rally to support WikiLeaks: Top 5 recent attacks

    Hackers rally to support WikiLeaks: Top 5 recent attacks

    In an effort nicknamed "Operation Payback," a loose association of hackers called "Anonymous" has been targeting the websites of companies and organizations that have cut ties with WikiLeaks by overwhelming their sites with traffic, prompting them to shut down. Twitter and Facebook have blocked accounts for Anonymous, citing the illegality of their attacks as a terms-of-service violation. WikiLeaks' Facebook and Twitter accounts remain up and running. “Of course, Anonymous is expected to keep creating new accounts as quickly as Facebook and Twitter squash them; it’s a bit like Whack-a-Mole or doing battle with a hydra, in that sense,” said social media news website Mashable. "Fighting Anonymous is a task we wouldn’t wish on anyone." Below are some of the most notable attacks.

  • West loses edge to Asia in education: Top five OECD findings

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development group of industrialized nations released the results Tuesday of the test they give to 15-year-old students to measure math, science, and reading capabilities. The test, administered every three years by OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), was taken in 2009 in the 34 countries of the OECD and in 41 partner countries and economies (i.e. regional economic entities). Below, some of the top findings in the study, which was released today:

  • Why China is reluctant to rein in North Korea's bellicose behavior

    Why China is reluctant to rein in North Korea's bellicose behavior

    North Korea is fueling a debate in ruling circles in Beijing over how far China should go in backing the regime in Pyongyang.

  • Israel wildfire: How it stacks up with five other devastating blazes

    Israel wildfire: How it stacks up with five other devastating blazes

    Israeli officials are racing to contain wildfires that began in northern Israel on Thursday morning, prompting the evacuation of 17,000 and a rare request for international assistance. But while these fires are devastating for Israel – as of Friday they've killed at least 42 people and burned an estimated 8,600 acres in the tiny country – they are far smaller than other major forest fires around the globe.

  • What NATO looks like in the age of European austerity

    What NATO looks like in the age of European austerity

    Amid budget cutbacks and a 'diminishing appetite' for war, Europe has turned increasingly to the 'soft power' assignments like training and institution-building.

  • Five things Russia and Qatar did right to win World Cup bids

    Five things Russia and Qatar did right to win World Cup bids

    Russia and Qatar were able to set themselves apart enough from the rest of the World Cup bidders to get FIFA’s vote Thursday. Russia will host the tournament in 2018 and Qatar in 2022. Here are five things they did right:

  • Who will host the 2022 World Cup?

    Who will host the 2022 World Cup?

    The 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup hosting rights will be decided in Zurich, Switzerland today. Here's the short list for the 2022 World Cup bid:

  • Who will host the 2018 World Cup?

    Who will host the 2018 World Cup?

    The 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup hosting rights will be decided today in Zurich, Switzerland. Here's the short list for the 2018 World Cup bid:

  • WikiLeaks' Julian Assange is merely 'fighting baddies,' says his mom

    WikiLeaks' Julian Assange is merely 'fighting baddies,' says his mom

    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's mother Christine is defending her son as fighting a good fight, saying she gave him a strong grounding in ethics.

  • World AIDS Day 2010: Top signs of progress

    World AIDS Day 2010: Top signs of progress

    In 2009, more than 33 million people worldwide were living with HIV. That's up from 26.2 million in 1999. Despite that staggering statistic, UNAIDS and other AIDS organizations are making progress in their efforts to control and eventually eradicate HIV/AIDS. World AIDS Day is a chance to take stock of how well these organizations are doing and where the world stands today.

  • WikiLeaks: What the world is saying

    WikiLeaks: What the world is saying

    The latest WikiLeaks trove of 250,000 diplomatic cables, obtained in advance by five news outlets, has generated enough fodder in the US alone to occupy American readers. But people all over, from Germany to Lebanon to Australia, are also talking about the sometimes troubling, sometimes mundane cables that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is gradually releasing for public consumption.

  • WikiLeaks: Top 5 revelations

    WikiLeaks: Top 5 revelations

    The newest WikiLeaks release comprises 251,287 cables from more than 250 United States embassies around the world, including thousands classified "Secret." With historical cables dating back to the 1960s, the trove is seven times the size of "The Iraq War Logs," making it the world's largest classified information release. The New York Times, Der Spiegel, El País, the Guardian, and Le Monde had early access to the logs. According to their analysis of the myriad issues discussed in the cables, these five are among the most striking revelations.