All Global Issues

  • Hosni Mubarak's exit plan: Where do exiled leaders go?

    Hosni Mubarak's exit plan: Where do exiled leaders go?

    With Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak appearing to be headed out of office, it’s likely he has thought about where he’d head next if he’s forced out of the country as well as the presidency. Ousted world leaders have a history of slipping away to other countries and living a life of relative anonymity and leisure in exile. If President Mubarak joins the ranks of those who fled their countries to live out the rest of their days elsewhere, where will he go? Some of his predecessors’ choices could give some guidance.

  • Rising global food prices squeeze the world's poor

    Rising global food prices squeeze the world's poor

    Weather, inflation, and biofuels pushed the United Nations food price index to an all-time high in December, sparking concern over the poor being left with empty plates.

  • South Sudan set to join ranks of five of the world's newest countries

    South Sudan set to join ranks of five of the world's newest countries

    The South Sudan referendum ended with an overwhelming vote for independence – 99.57 percent of those polled voted for it – and put the region officially on track to become independent in July. How often is a country born? (Or wrested from territory of an already existing one?) Here’s a look at five of the most recent declarations of independence:

  • Hunger and food security: Is Africa selling the farm?

    Hunger and food security: Is Africa selling the farm?

    Foreign investors see Africa as a breadbasket. Done well, investment could help with African hunger but create food security for the rest of the world.

  • Hunger and food security: One way to create an African breadbasket

    Hunger and food security: One way to create an African breadbasket

    Foreign investment in a Zambian farming firm may be a business model for Africa's hunger and food security problems.

  • Nine countries in the Middle East where 'winds of change' are blowing

    Nine countries in the Middle East where 'winds of change' are blowing

    Those who said that "winds of change" were blowing through the Middle East were right. The past few weeks have seen a series of political shifts in response to widespread discontent and popular opposition that once went unacknowledged. On Friday, Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak ceded to protesters in Cairo and stepped down. As Egyptians' cries, first of anger and now of jubilation, beam into living rooms throughout the Middle East, here is a look at where those "winds of change" are taking us. (Editor's note: This is an updated version of a story that originally ran on Feb. 2)

  • How 5 revolutions got their names

    Questions are cropping up about the appropriateness of calling Tunisia's uprising the "Jasmine Revolution" – stemming from the fact that the term has been used in reference to Syria in 2005 and even the path that brought ousted Tunisian President Ben Ali to power. But the moniker could stick, at least partially because it's become a tradition of sorts to name the revolutions of the 2000s after colors and flowers and even household items. Here's an overview of some of the popular revolutions – and their nicknames – that preceded Tunisia's ... whatever you want to call it:

  • How retirement is being reinvented worldwide

    How retirement is being reinvented worldwide

    People are working longer – out of necessity and choice – as the world undergoes one of the biggest demographic shifts in history.

  • Arizona shooting: US has lots of guns, but it's not alone

    Arizona shooting: US has lots of guns, but it's not alone

    The shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D) of Arizona has brought renewed attention to the US 'gun culture' and gun violence – and the prevalence of guns in the country. In fact, the US has the largest number of civilian-owned guns in the world, both in raw number and relative to its total population, according to a 2007 report by Small Arms Survey, a Geneva-based project that studies small arms and armed violence. But some countries aren't too far behind the US. Below are some of the countries with the largest civilian gun ownership rates in the world.

  • Haiti earthquake anniversary: the state of global disaster relief

    Haiti earthquake anniversary: the state of global disaster relief

    On the first anniversary of the Haiti earthquake, global disaster relief is under the microscope. A $15-billion-a-year industry with 250,000 workers, the stakes are high – but from each tsunami, quake, hurricane, and drought, we learn what works and what doesn't.

  • A Haiti disaster relief worker fights cholera and despair

    A Haiti disaster relief worker fights cholera and despair

    Emmet Fitzgerald, like thousands of other global disaster relief nomads, is at work 24 hours a day amid the Haiti earthquake debris – in the fight against cholera and other forms of despair, he sometimes goes into his own wallet to solve immediate problems in the camp he manages.

  • New Year's Eve 2011 around the world

    New Year's Eve 2011 around the world

    Much of the US will be tuning into the Times Square ball drop in New York City, but there are celebrations to rival that one around the world. Below are some of the world's biggest New Year's Eve celebrations.

  • Top 6 most triumphant stories of 2010

    Top 6 most triumphant stories of 2010

    Most 2010 lists of major news will include the Gulf oil spill, the Haiti earthquake, the Republican midterm election sweep, and WikiLeaks. But we saw many events that also inspired or amazed or brought a smile. Here's our top 6 list.

  • The world in 2011: Trends and events to watch in every region

    The world in 2011: Trends and events to watch in every region

    Monitor staff writers and correspondents in each of the world's regions share what they expect to be top headlines in 2011.

  • Taliban Christmas trees, Bethlehem disco carols, and other yuletide tales from the Monitor's vault

    Taliban Christmas trees, Bethlehem disco carols, and other yuletide tales from the Monitor's vault

    The Monitor's correspondents around the world have shared some great Christmas stories over the years – from cradles of Christianity, such as Bethlehem, and from less likely places, such as China, Afghanistan, and Cairo. Click through the slides for highlights of past years' holiday coverage.

  • Skype brings 10 million users back online, but millions more still without call service

    Skype brings 10 million users back online, but millions more still without call service

    Luxembourg internet phone company Skype said this morning that users had doubled in several hours to 10 million people, though the impact on investor sentiment may be more lasting.

  • Suicide attacks down, Predator drone exits, and other overlooked stories in 2010

    Here are some stories in 2010 that you may have overlooked, including a global decline in suicide attacks and the phasing out of the Predator drone.

  • WikiLeaks army 'Anonymous' eyes Bank of America with 'Operation BOA Constrictor'

    WikiLeaks army 'Anonymous' eyes Bank of America with 'Operation BOA Constrictor'

    Anonymous, the loosely knit association of WikiLeaks supporters, is seeking to rally the online faithful to attack Bank of America with 'Operation BOA Constrictor.'

  • Quirky Christmas traditions around the world

    Quirky Christmas traditions around the world

    Christmas cheer is widespread in the days leading up to Dec. 24 and 25, but it manifests itself in many different ways, from predicting the future to trying not to choke on a hidden coin. Below are just a few of the many unusual Christmas traditions around the world.

  • WikiLeaks' Julian Assange issues threat and complains about ... leaks

    WikiLeaks' Julian Assange issues threat and complains about ... leaks

    In interviews published today, WikiLeaks' Julian Assange issued threats and lashed out at his collaborators, his rape accusers, and the Swedish government.