All Book Reviews

  • Benny & Shrimp

    Two warm-hearted titles for late-summer reads.

  • The Calligrapher’s Daughter

    A novel set during the 30-year oppression of Korea by the Japanese.

  • Born Round

    Former New York Times restaurant critic Frank Bruni writes movingly of his love-hate relationship with food.

  • How Rome Fell

    Rome’s decline began at the top, contends British historian Adrian Goldsworthy.

  • The Immortals

    The gap between ambition and reality is examined in this novel about two music-loving Bombay families.

  • South of Broad

    Pat Conroy’s first novel in 14 years follows a group of young friends on into adult life.

  • Classic review: March

    Mr. March, from 'Little Women,' enlists to fight for equality.

  • Velva Jean Learns to Drive

    A coming-of-age tale about a young girl growing up in Appalachia in the decade before World War II.

  • The Book of William

    The story of Shakespeare’s First Folio – the most valuable secular book in the world.

  • The Slippery Year

    Twelve monthly essays that take a writer through a year of challenge with humor, heart, and plenty of self-deprecation.

  • The Age of Wonder

    Richard Holmes paints a different picture of the Romantic Age, one in which scientific discovery and artistic creation shared close company.

  • Provenance

    The amazing tale of one of the most audacious scams in the history of art.

  • Say Everything

    A history of blogging – and why it matters.

  • Classic book review: My Life in France

    One simple, perfect French meal changed the life of Julia Childs.

  • Some Dream for Fools

    The worries of a young Algerian immigrant trying to find a place in contemporary Paris.

  • Rhino Ranch

    McMurtry’s fifth and final novel about Duane Moore, whose story began in 1966’s “The Last Picture Show.”

  • The Generalissimo

    Chiang Kai-shek has been unfairly condemned by history, argues a new biography.

  • Dangerous Games

    Margaret MacMillan warns of what can happen when history is misappropriated.

  • Inherent Vice

    Reclusive novelist Thomas Pynchon steps out of character with a thriller.

  • We Two: Victoria and Albert

    Gillian Gill offers a fresh examination of the remarkable marriage of Queen Victoria and her consort Prince Albert.