All list articles

  • Kate Middleton and Prince William: How well do you know them? A quiz.

    Kate Middleton and Prince William: How well do you know them? A quiz.

    Everyone's buzzing about the Tuesday announcement of Prince William's engagement to longtime girlfriend Kate Middleton. How closely have you been following the coverage? Take the quiz.

  • Bestselling books the week of 11/18/10, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 11/18/10, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Royal engagement: Who is Kate Middleton?

    Royal engagement: Who is Kate Middleton?

    The fount of information about Kate Middleton, Prince William's fiance, will be unending from now until the wedding in spring or summer 2011. She has been one of the most searched items on the Internet since the engagement announcement Tuesday. There is far more about her available online than can be condensed into one article – but here are some highlights about Kate (Catherine Elizabeth) Middleton and her engagement.

  • 5 reasons the US wanted Viktor Bout

    5 reasons the US wanted Viktor Bout

    Accused Russian arms trader Viktor Bout is to appear in court in New York on Wednesday. The previous day, he was extradited from Thailand, where he was arrested in 2008 and from where he fought an unsuccessful two-year legal battle against being turned over to US custody. He has always denied supplying weapons to armed groups and governments. For many years, he ran a legitimate air-cargo business that was accused by the United Nations of flouting sanctions in Africa and the Middle East. In recent years, he has lived in Moscow and rarely traveled outside Russia. He has been indicted for conspiring to sell weapons to a terrorist organization and of conspiring to kill US nationals. He has denied the charges.

  • Senate's 16 new members arrive on Capitol Hill: Who are they?

    Senate's 16 new members arrive on Capitol Hill: Who are they?

    Starting this Monday, the Senate welcomes 16 fresh faces to the Capitol’s marbled halls. While they won’t be sworn into office until January, these newly-elected members – three Democrats and 13 Republicans – come to Washington to tour the buildings, learn rules of decorum, and meet with their future coworkers. The new Senators come largely from open seats where both parties had a new candidate on the ticket and include a handful of tea partyers.

  • The top words and phrases of 2010

    The top words and phrases of 2010

    The Global Language Monitor, a language analytics company based in Texas, tracks language trends around the world. One of its projects is an annual list of the year's most buzzed-about words, phrases, and people, which provides a good snapshot of what the world was thinking about in 2010. Click through below for the five most popular words and phrases of 2010.

  • Royal wedding: Five traditions of royal nuptials

    Royal wedding: Five traditions of royal nuptials

    After years of speculation about when they would wed, Prince William and Kate Middleton announced their engagement on Tuesday. The announcement seems to have thrilled Britons, both the public and the press. The wedding and the buzz leading up to it are likely to provide a bit of cheer for a nation – though some people are sure to grouse about the cost of what is sure to be a lavish affair at a time of sobering austerity cuts. Below are some of the royal wedding and marriage traditions that we will surely hear more about in coming months.

  • 5 children's books by US politicians

    5 children's books by US politicians

    Barack Obama is not alone. Other presidents – and presidential hopefuls – have also written books for children.

  • Study in America: Top 5 countries sending students to US

    Study in America: Top 5 countries sending students to US

    A record number of international students – 690,923 – attended colleges and universities in the United States during the 2009-10 academic year, according to the just-released "Open Doors" report. Which countries sent the most students? Here is a countdown of the top five places, using data from the Institute of International Education, which publishes this survey annually.

  • Top 5 high-profile captures by Somali pirates

    Top 5 high-profile captures by Somali pirates

    After 388 days as prisoners of Somali pirates, Paul and Rachel Chandler were released Nov. 14. They were among 1,052 hostages taken in 2009, in addition to the 773 hostages taken in the first nine months of 2010, according to a recent report by the International Maritime Bureau. Click through the following slides to read about the Chandlers' ordeal and other high-profile captures.

  • Hajj 101: Five facts about the Muslim pilgrimage

    Hajj 101: Five facts about the Muslim pilgrimage

    More than two million Muslims have flocked to Saudi Arabia this week for the Hajj, the annual pilgrimage that Muslims are obligated to make at least once in their lifetime. Their destination is Mecca, Islam’s holiest city, and the pilgrimage is the fifth pillar of Islam, making it one of the religion’s chief obligations. The number of pilgrims that travel to Saudi Arabia every year have made the Hajj, which typically lasts five days, one of the greatest religious events in the world.

  • R&D spending: Here are the Top 10 firms

    R&D spending: Here are the Top 10 firms

    Apple, Google, and 3M may top Bloomberg’s list of the world’s most innovative companies, but they’re not the biggest research and development spenders – not even part of the Top 20. Out of 1,000 publicly traded companies with the highest R&D spending in 2009, here are the Top 10, according to a survey by management-consulting firm Booz & Co.:

  • 4 ugly websites from companies that should know better

    4 ugly websites from companies that should know better

    Good website design is about more than looks. It’s about practical page layout, logical navigation, clear messaging, and of course, relevant content. Still, first impressions are powerful, in the real world and online. If a site’s homepage doesn’t make the grade visually, users might not want to stick around. These big-name companies should know better.

  • Are you an owl or a lark? A chronotype quiz.

    Are you an owl or a lark? A chronotype quiz.

    A person's chronotype indicates how a person may perform at different times of day. Some people ('larks') find themselves most alert earlier in the day, and will go to bed early. 'Owls' may be most alert at night and prefer to go to bed late. Recent research from the London School of Economics suggests that 'owls' tend to have higher IQs, but a 2006 study by psychologist Marina Giampietro found that late risers may be more likely to suffer from depression. Studies at the University of Bologna have shown that 'larks' may be more conscientious people. Early birds, of course, also get the worm. Where do you fall on morning-evening spectrum? Are you a lark or an owl? Take the quiz and add up your points to find out:

  • How bankruptcy-proof are you? Find your color.

    How bankruptcy-proof are you? Find your color.

    Every day, 4,200 Americans declare bankruptcy. It’s a stressful experience, but it doesn’t happen out of the blue. There are warning signs along the way. Joan Feeney and Theodore Connolly, authors of “The Road Out of Debt: Bankruptcy and Other Solutions to Your Financial Problems,” have developed a color-coded alert system similar to the government's Homeland Security advisory system. What’s your bankruptcy color?

  • Bestselling books the week of 11/11/10, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 11/11/10, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores all across America.

  • The G20's top points of contention

    The G20's top points of contention

    The Group of 20 faces a lot of heat each time it gathers. Streets swell with protesters and clashes with police often end in property damage and violence. But the contention doesn’t end at the doors to the meeting rooms. Within the G20, there are some significant divides on key trade issues.

  • Middle school trick play: Top 5 trick plays

    Middle school trick play: Top 5 trick plays

    Middle school trick play from Texas has caught the eye of many web video junkies. You've probably seen the Corpus Christi middle school trick play that resulted in a game-tying touchdown(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0UIdI8khMkw). We wanted to check out some other football trick plays on the web and came up with these five. Go team!

  • Waterboarding and other 'Decision Points' in Bush's war on terror

    Waterboarding and other 'Decision Points' in Bush's war on terror

    Former President George W. Bush has returned to political life with today's release of his new memoir, 'Decision Points.' Controversial decisions during his tenure as commander-in-chief have also returned to public scrutiny, with the 43rd president talking openly in interviews this week about his choice to approve waterboarding and other questionable acts in the war on terror.

  • The five most dangerous countries for journalists

    The five most dangerous countries for journalists

    The brutal beating of Russian journalist Oleg Kashin outside his apartment building Nov. 6 draws renewed attention to the dangers that reporters face in many countries – including death, violence, imprisonment, exile, and threats to their families. The Committee to Protect Journalists tracks journalists’ deaths, imprisonments, and other forms of intimidation. Deaths are classified as work-related if they are killed in a hostile action tied to their journalism work – caught in crossfire or retribution for their work, for example – and do not include those media members who worked alongside the journalists, nor those cases in which the motive for the killing is unconfirmed. Below are some of the world’s most dangerous countries in which to be a journalist, according to CPJ.

  • 10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    10 women in Congress who won’t be back

    The 2010 elections were tough on all Democrats, but particularly on female lawmakers. The upcoming 112th Congress may see fewer women in office on Capitol Hill than last session. Yet-to-decided races in the House and Senate will determine if that happens, but if it does, it would be the first time in 32 years that the number of women in Congress declines from one session to the next. What's already clear is that 10 women are not returning. Most of the congresswomen defeated Tuesday were House freshmen. Two had served multiple House terms, and one was a Senate veteran. Some lost to tea party favorites and conservatives backed by Sarah Palin, while others were bested by standard-issue Republicans. Here are the women, some familiar and some not, we will not see on Capitol Hill come January as a result of Election Day losses. Source: CNN, National Journal‚ Almanac of American Politics, Politico

  • An 'ARE YOU SMARTER THAN  AL GORE?' energy quiz

    An 'ARE YOU SMARTER THAN AL GORE?' energy quiz

    Everyone has been conditioned to flick off lights when they leave a room – or, if they forget, to tromp dutifully back to turn them off. Many such energy-saving actions have become routines that make us feel very green, very much the global good citizens helping to reduce dependence on fossil fuels. We don't really know how Al Gore would do on this quiz. But if you take it and ace it, you might feel a little competitive with the man who won the Nobel Peace Prize for his efforts to counter climate change by reconsidering the energy choices behind the problem. Take our quiz and find out how much you really know about your energy use:

  • Five countries where the GOP victory could make a difference

    Five countries where the GOP victory could make a difference

    Foreign policy is typically the executive branch’s domain because that is the branch that decides who the US negotiates with and what gets offered in those negotiations. However, Tuesday’s Republican victory, particularly the GOP takeover of the House and leadership of some key committees, has the ability to affect the US's dialogue, and in some cases policy, on a few key US relationships with other countries.

  • 3 great books for November

    3 great books for November

    When the days get short and the nights grow long, what you need is a great book. I recommend grabbing at least one of these three terrific new releases.

  • Recession over? Not in these four cities.

    Recession over? Not in these four cities.

    America's longest postwar recession officially ended more than a year ago. But in some places, the recession still looks alive and well. Here are four cities that over the past year have seen the biggest drops in employment and at least a 1 percentage point rise in the unemployment rate, according to the US Department of Labor. Is your city on the list?