All list articles

  • WikiLeaks: What the world is saying

    WikiLeaks: What the world is saying

    The latest WikiLeaks trove of 250,000 diplomatic cables, obtained in advance by five news outlets, has generated enough fodder in the US alone to occupy American readers. But people all over, from Germany to Lebanon to Australia, are also talking about the sometimes troubling, sometimes mundane cables that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is gradually releasing for public consumption.

  • Holiday gift guide 2010: Top 5 music picks

    Holiday gift guide 2010: Top 5 music picks

    Music is appreciated throughout the year and makes a great holiday gift for family and friends. Here are some suggestions – ranging from Ken Burns' 'Baseball' soundtrack to Dave Brubeck – recommended by the Monitor staff. Click on the link at the end of each item to purchase on amazon.com, and a small percentage will go to support the Monitor.

  • WikiLeaks: The five strangest stories...so far

    WikiLeaks: The five strangest stories...so far

    The release of US diplomatic cables by WikiLeaks contains some serious stuff: US diplomats have been trying to steal the credit card numbers of top UN officials, Saudi Arabia is putting pressure on the US to attack Iran, Iran has obtained advanced long-range missiles from North Korea. Other cables are not so earth-shaking, but they nonetheless reveal personalities and events that are comical, surprising, or just plain weird. Here's our top five.

  • WikiLeaks reveals 5 Arab countries concerned about Iran

    WikiLeaks reveals 5 Arab countries concerned about Iran

    It’s common knowledge that the Israeli government considers Iran an existential threat, and that it has been trying to persuade the US to act more forcefully. And while there have always been rumblings of discontent with Iran among Arab nations, the WikiLeaks release Sunday provides concrete evidence that Israel isn’t the only one in the region to feel worried. The now-disclosed but formerly secret diplomatic cables reveal that several Sunni-led Arab nations, particularly Saudi Arabia, also sought to curb Shiite-led Iran. Below are five Arab countries keeping a watchful eye.

  • Identity theft: five simple ways to protect yourself

    Identity theft: five simple ways to protect yourself

    Identity theft has been around forever. Even in ancient times, impersonators would pretend to be someone they were not – a prince, a long-lost heir to a great fortune, a merchant who had died at sea. The Internet has made the theft much easier. A hack here, a lost flash drive there, and tens of thousands of people can find themselves with false credit-card charges or drained bank accounts. In 2008 alone, 10 million Americans had their identity stolen. Here are five practical tips to keep your identity safe:

  • WikiLeaks documents: five world leaders disparaged by US diplomats

    WikiLeaks documents: five world leaders disparaged by US diplomats

    World leaders smile and back-slap like old friends at summit meeting photo-ops. But behind the bonhomie they may be judging each other’s strengths and weaknesses with the brutal candor of high school students sizing up rivals. The huge cache of diplomatic cables made public by WikiLeaks contain frank assessments of many top geopolitical players – and predictions as to how their personalities might affect US politics.

  • Holiday gift guide 2010: DVDs for the family

    Holiday gift guide 2010: DVDs for the family

    Now that we're fully into the holiday shopping season, Monitor staff writers have compiled a list of items you might consider as Christmas or Hanukkah gifts. We begin with some family-friendly DVDs. Each item has a link to amazon.com, where you can purchase the item and help support the Christian Science Monitor at the same time.

  • WikiLeaks: Top 5 revelations

    WikiLeaks: Top 5 revelations

    The newest WikiLeaks release comprises 251,287 cables from more than 250 United States embassies around the world, including thousands classified "Secret." With historical cables dating back to the 1960s, the trove is seven times the size of "The Iraq War Logs," making it the world's largest classified information release. The New York Times, Der Spiegel, El País, the Guardian, and Le Monde had early access to the logs. According to their analysis of the myriad issues discussed in the cables, these five are among the most striking revelations.

  • Bestselling audiobooks in the English-speaking world

    Bestselling audiobooks in the English-speaking world

    Amid all the hype about e-readers, let's not forget audiobooks, an alternative to traditional print that’s been around since vinyl records. Here are some of the audiobook titles now topping bestseller lists in the English-speaking world.

  • Bestselling books the week of 11/23/10, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 11/23/10, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • North Korean attack on South Korea: 8 provocations of the past decade

    North Korean attack on South Korea: 8 provocations of the past decade

    North Korea shelled South Korea's Yeonpyeong island Tuesday, killing two South Korean marines and injuring more than a dozen people. South Korea returned fire. Both sides claimed that the other fired first. While the South has engaged in past attacks – notably in November 2009, when it fired on a North Korean patrol boat, and in June 1999, when it sunk a North Korean vessel – history shows that Pyongyang is often the instigator. A 2007 report from the US Congressional Research Service documents dozens of provocations, ranging from low-level naval warfare to assassinations of South Korean cabinet officers. Here are seven examples of the North's military provocations over the past decade.

  • Sarah Palin's heroes – and antiheroes

    Sarah Palin's heroes – and antiheroes

    Sarah Palin's new book, "America By Heart: Reflections on Family, Faith, and Flag," includes numerous references to Americans – and occasionally non-Americans – of whom she approves. Many of Palin's choices are not surprising (Ronald Reagan, Margaret Thatcher, Thomas Jefferson) while others (Judd Aptow, Simon Cowell, Elvis Presley) are. Often, Palin praises one figure by disparaging another. Taken together, her likes and dislikes offer a quick recap of her worldview.

  • Royal wedding date: What we know about the marriage plans of William and Kate

    Royal wedding date: What we know about the marriage plans of William and Kate

    Royal wedding date-watchers need speculate no more. When the long-awaited engagement of Prince William and longtime girlfriend Kate Middleton was announced last week, they and their wedding planners were bombarded with questions. Where did that gorgeous ring come from? Who will design the wedding dress?And – when will the wedding of the decade be? Some of those questions were answered immediately (the ring originally belonged to William's mother, the late Princess Diana), some have since been answered, and some remain up in the air (rumors run rampant about who will design Kate's wedding gown, but nothing has been confirmed). Here are some of the details that have been finalized.

  • Bare feet to pat-downs: Five big changes in TSA screening at airports

    Bare feet to pat-downs: Five big changes in TSA screening at airports

    Security screening at US airports has undergone waves of changes in the years since 9/11. Here are five of the biggest changes to affect air travelers in recent years.

  • Royal Wedding Date: Top 4 possible dates

    Royal Wedding Date: Top 4 possible dates

    It's enough to create a royal tizzy. With Prince William and Kate Middleton engaged to be married, they must now settle on a wedding date – while dodging obstacles posed by friends' weddings, a major political referendum, and, of course, Britain's cold and rainy months. Sources are speculating, guessing, estimating, and guesstimating on the possible day. It's of importance to more than royal watchers, friends, and family of William and Kate. Many brides-to-be are concerned that their special day will be overshadowed by what tabloids are calling the biggest wedding of the decade. Here are the four likely wedding dates being bandied about:

  • TSA screenings: What protections do you have?

    TSA screenings: What protections do you have?

    Full-body scans and enhanced pat-downs have become America’s “primary screening” technique, but have also generated a rising tide of criticism for being too invasive. At each of the 68 major airports where the 385 new full-body scanners are in place, passengers will be directed to them, says Sarah Horowitz, spokeswoman for the Transportation Security Administration (TSA). Here's what to expect – and what protections you can demand:

  • World Toilet Day: Top 10 nations lacking toilets

    World Toilet Day: Top 10 nations lacking toilets

    See a lot of people squatting in the open today? Don't be offended. The so-called "big squat" was held worldwide to coincide with the 10th annual World Toilet Day, an initiative to bring awareness to the need for adequate sanitary facilities. Every day, some 1.1 billion people go to the bathroom without any type of toilet, according to the World Health Organization. And even with a toilet, facilities are not necessarily sanitary. WaterAid America estimates that roughly 2.5 billion people – nearly 40 percent of the global population – do their business unsafely, often in public spaces. World Toilet Day is organized by the Singapore-based World Toilet Organization, which has 235 member organizations in 58 countries "working toward eliminating the toilet taboo and delivering sustainable sanitation." Here's a list of the world's worst nations in terms of people lacking access to sanitary facilities.

  • 19 countries that won't be at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony

    19 countries that won't be at the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony

    This year's Nobel Peace Prize ceremony on Dec. 10 won't only be missing its honoree, Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, who is under house arrest in China. The number of countries that have declined invitations to attend has risen from six to 19 in the past two months. Nobel committee members suspect that has something to do with China's "you're either with us or against us" tone urging other nations to join its boycott of the Oslo ceremony. Beijing boasted Tuesday that most countries would stay away from attending the ceremony. In fact, only the 65 countries with embassies in Norway were invited, and 44 of those had accepted, according to the Nobel Prize Committee. Who's standing with China? Here's a list. (click on the blue circle in the upper right corner of this page to move through the slides)

  • Europe on alert: fall 2010 terror plots

    Europe on alert: fall 2010 terror plots

    Al Qaeda-linked terror threats in Europe this fall put intelligence and security forces, as well as the public, on edge. Most recently, Germany ramped up its security in anticipation of a possible attack. Below, an overview of those threats and incidents:

  • Harry Potter: A chronology

    Harry Potter: A chronology

    As the world waits for the Nov. 19 release of Harry Potter film No. 7 ("Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" Part 1), it's fun to remember Harry as he's been revealed to us through the years.

  • Kate Middleton and Prince William: How well do you know them? A quiz.

    Kate Middleton and Prince William: How well do you know them? A quiz.

    Everyone's buzzing about the Tuesday announcement of Prince William's engagement to longtime girlfriend Kate Middleton. How closely have you been following the coverage? Take the quiz.

  • Bestselling books the week of 11/18/10, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 11/18/10, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Royal engagement: Who is Kate Middleton?

    Royal engagement: Who is Kate Middleton?

    The fount of information about Kate Middleton, Prince William's fiance, will be unending from now until the wedding in spring or summer 2011. She has been one of the most searched items on the Internet since the engagement announcement Tuesday. There is far more about her available online than can be condensed into one article – but here are some highlights about Kate (Catherine Elizabeth) Middleton and her engagement.

  • 5 reasons the US wanted Viktor Bout

    5 reasons the US wanted Viktor Bout

    Accused Russian arms trader Viktor Bout is to appear in court in New York on Wednesday. The previous day, he was extradited from Thailand, where he was arrested in 2008 and from where he fought an unsuccessful two-year legal battle against being turned over to US custody. He has always denied supplying weapons to armed groups and governments. For many years, he ran a legitimate air-cargo business that was accused by the United Nations of flouting sanctions in Africa and the Middle East. In recent years, he has lived in Moscow and rarely traveled outside Russia. He has been indicted for conspiring to sell weapons to a terrorist organization and of conspiring to kill US nationals. He has denied the charges.

  • Senate's 16 new members arrive on Capitol Hill: Who are they?

    Senate's 16 new members arrive on Capitol Hill: Who are they?

    Starting this Monday, the Senate welcomes 16 fresh faces to the Capitol’s marbled halls. While they won’t be sworn into office until January, these newly-elected members – three Democrats and 13 Republicans – come to Washington to tour the buildings, learn rules of decorum, and meet with their future coworkers. The new Senators come largely from open seats where both parties had a new candidate on the ticket and include a handful of tea partyers.

 
 
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