All list articles

  • 5 irresistible children's picture books

    5 irresistible children's picture books

    It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been reading or how grown-up you think you’ve become – children’s picture books remain one of the greatest delights a reader can experience.

  • Holiday gift guide 2010: Four video games

    Holiday gift guide 2010: Four video games

    We have four different video game ideas for you this holiday season. Everything from an early 20th century Western to a soft pink creature and a couple in between. If you decide to purchase a particular video game, you might consider using the link below the item and help the Monitor at the same time.

  • Deficit commission: four reasons it could fail

    Deficit commission: four reasons it could fail

    The members of President Obama's bipartisan fiscal commission agree on one big thing: The problem of runaway deficits and public debt requires urgent attention. Democrats and Republicans on the panel even seem to have moved toward consensus on some of the policy responses to the problem. But getting to "yes" on a plan to stabilize the national debt still faces big hurdles. Here are four of big areas of disagreement.

  • 3 more 2010 novels that you don't want to miss

    3 more 2010 novels that you don't want to miss

    Two private investigators are forced to deal with the aftermath of a case that has haunted them for more than a decade, Herman Melville sets sail, and an Israeli mother goes for a very long walk in this month’s roundup of new fiction.

  • Charles Rangel censure vote: Five others the House has slapped down

    Charles Rangel censure vote: Five others the House has slapped down

    Rep. Charles Rangel (D) of New York on Thursday may become the 23rd House member to be censured by his colleagues, in the history of the institution. For lawmakers who break the rules, censure is one of the punishment options specified in the US Constitution (the others are expulsion, reprimand, or a fine). A public verbal rebuke from the House speaker is usually the outcome of a censure vote – humiliating, yes, but much less draconian than expulsion. Mr. Rangel is in trouble for 11 ethics violations related to his personal finances and fundraising efforts for a New York college. A censure vote has not occurred in the House in 27 years. Here are the five congressmen censured most recently, for matters ranging from fraud to sexual misconduct to “unparliamentary language.”

  • Best books of 2010: children's books

    Best books of 2010: children's books

    From the tribulations of a governess whose young charges were literally raised by wolves to the perils of a young heroine set on saving her planet, here are the 8 children's/young adult titles that the Monitor's book reviewers considered the most outstanding this year. To assist you with your holiday shopping, each title here has a link that allows you to purchase the book – even as you help to support The Christian Science Monitor

  • Deficit commission: Four things both sides may agree on

    Deficit commission: Four things both sides may agree on

    Thursday headlines note the failure of President Obama's bipartisan deficit commission to reach consensus, but the opposite is also true to some extent. Key Democrats and Republicans on the commission voiced agreement on some important things during the panel's public meeting Wednesday. Sooner or later, these points of common ground could help pave the way for legislation.

  • Five things Russia and Qatar did right to win World Cup bids

    Five things Russia and Qatar did right to win World Cup bids

    Russia and Qatar were able to set themselves apart enough from the rest of the World Cup bidders to get FIFA’s vote Thursday. Russia will host the tournament in 2018 and Qatar in 2022. Here are five things they did right:

  • Holiday gift guide 2010: Television programs

    Holiday gift guide 2010: Television programs

    We have more gift ideas for you this holiday season. For the person who enjoys Canadian television comedy, World War II drama, a TV documentary on mankind's narrative myths, and a classic British television detective series, we have a quartet of selections. By the way, if you would like to purchase any of these DVD sets, there are links to do so on each page and you can help the Monitor at the same time.

  • Who will host the 2022 World Cup?

    Who will host the 2022 World Cup?

    The 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup hosting rights will be decided in Zurich, Switzerland today. Here's the short list for the 2022 World Cup bid:

  • Who will host the 2018 World Cup?

    Who will host the 2018 World Cup?

    The 2018 and 2022 FIFA World Cup hosting rights will be decided today in Zurich, Switzerland. Here's the short list for the 2018 World Cup bid:

  • Congress lets unemployment benefits expire: 'What now' and six other questions

    Congress lets unemployment benefits expire: 'What now' and six other questions

    More than 2 million unemployed people awoke Wednesday to the prospect that they may no longer have unemployment checks to help them pay rent or buy food and gas. Congress on Tuesday failed to renew an extension of unemployment benefits that it passed at the end of July. Democrats have argued that with unemployment at 9.6 percent, many people still need help. Republicans say they would like to help the jobless, but want the $5 billion per month cost to be funded by a spending cut somewhere in the federal budget.

  • Best books of 2010: fiction

    Best books of 2010: fiction

    In 2010 Monitor reviewers critiqued hundreds of books. Here's a list of the 11 fiction titles they considered the most outstanding. To assist you with your holiday shopping, each title here has a link that allows you to purchase the book – even as you help to support The Christian Science Monitor

  • World AIDS Day 2010: Top signs of progress

    World AIDS Day 2010: Top signs of progress

    In 2009, more than 33 million people worldwide were living with HIV. That's up from 26.2 million in 1999. Despite that staggering statistic, UNAIDS and other AIDS organizations are making progress in their efforts to control and eventually eradicate HIV/AIDS. World AIDS Day is a chance to take stock of how well these organizations are doing and where the world stands today.

  • WikiLeaks 101: Five questions about who did what and when

    WikiLeaks 101: Five questions about who did what and when

    The WikiLeaks controversy pits one hallowed purpose of US government – preventing security threats from abroad – against another, that of protecting constitutional rights of expression by the media and individuals. Striking that balance has become difficult in an age of the Internet hackers, bloggers, self-appointed public policy watchdogs, and thousands of online “publications” marked by ideology and attitude. So far, WikiLeaks has released more than 700,000 sensitive or classified documents about US military and diplomatic activity – 92,000 on the war in Afghanistan, 392,000 on the Iraq war, and now nearly 250,000 diplomatic cables that US officials say are damaging to foreign relations and intelligence operations. Within weeks, WikiLeaks says, it’ll release inside information on business interests – starting with a major American bank. WikiLeaks 101 is your guide to understanding what happened. Here are answers to five key questions.

  • Holiday gift guide 2010: Four TV and movie classics

    Holiday gift guide 2010: Four TV and movie classics

    We continue our effort to provide you with gift ideas this holiday season. In this installment, we're looking at classic movie and television show DVD collections. Earlier this week, we posted a list of "DVDs for the family" (see link below). If you decide to purchase a particular DVD, you might consider using the link below the item and help the Monitor at the same time.

  • Food Safety Act: five food recalls that rattled the industry

    Food Safety Act: five food recalls that rattled the industry

    The Senate's passage of the Food Safety Act, the most sweeping food-safety law in 70 years has thrown a spotlight on the US food supply. Here are five of the most recent high-profile food safety cases:

  • Best books of 2010: nonfiction

    Best books of 2010: nonfiction

    In 2010 Monitor reviewers critiqued hundreds of books. Here's a list of the 28 nonfiction titles they considered the most outstanding. To assist you with your holiday shopping, each title here has a link that allows you to purchase the book – even as you help to support The Christian Science Monitor

  • WikiLeaks: What the world is saying

    WikiLeaks: What the world is saying

    The latest WikiLeaks trove of 250,000 diplomatic cables, obtained in advance by five news outlets, has generated enough fodder in the US alone to occupy American readers. But people all over, from Germany to Lebanon to Australia, are also talking about the sometimes troubling, sometimes mundane cables that WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is gradually releasing for public consumption.

  • Holiday gift guide 2010: Top 5 music picks

    Holiday gift guide 2010: Top 5 music picks

    Music is appreciated throughout the year and makes a great holiday gift for family and friends. Here are some suggestions – ranging from Ken Burns' 'Baseball' soundtrack to Dave Brubeck – recommended by the Monitor staff. Click on the link at the end of each item to purchase on amazon.com, and a small percentage will go to support the Monitor.

  • WikiLeaks: The five strangest stories...so far

    WikiLeaks: The five strangest stories...so far

    The release of US diplomatic cables by WikiLeaks contains some serious stuff: US diplomats have been trying to steal the credit card numbers of top UN officials, Saudi Arabia is putting pressure on the US to attack Iran, Iran has obtained advanced long-range missiles from North Korea. Other cables are not so earth-shaking, but they nonetheless reveal personalities and events that are comical, surprising, or just plain weird. Here's our top five.

  • WikiLeaks reveals 5 Arab countries concerned about Iran

    WikiLeaks reveals 5 Arab countries concerned about Iran

    It’s common knowledge that the Israeli government considers Iran an existential threat, and that it has been trying to persuade the US to act more forcefully. And while there have always been rumblings of discontent with Iran among Arab nations, the WikiLeaks release Sunday provides concrete evidence that Israel isn’t the only one in the region to feel worried. The now-disclosed but formerly secret diplomatic cables reveal that several Sunni-led Arab nations, particularly Saudi Arabia, also sought to curb Shiite-led Iran. Below are five Arab countries keeping a watchful eye.

  • Identity theft: five simple ways to protect yourself

    Identity theft: five simple ways to protect yourself

    Identity theft has been around forever. Even in ancient times, impersonators would pretend to be someone they were not – a prince, a long-lost heir to a great fortune, a merchant who had died at sea. The Internet has made the theft much easier. A hack here, a lost flash drive there, and tens of thousands of people can find themselves with false credit-card charges or drained bank accounts. In 2008 alone, 10 million Americans had their identity stolen. Here are five practical tips to keep your identity safe:

  • WikiLeaks documents: five world leaders disparaged by US diplomats

    WikiLeaks documents: five world leaders disparaged by US diplomats

    World leaders smile and back-slap like old friends at summit meeting photo-ops. But behind the bonhomie they may be judging each other’s strengths and weaknesses with the brutal candor of high school students sizing up rivals. The huge cache of diplomatic cables made public by WikiLeaks contain frank assessments of many top geopolitical players – and predictions as to how their personalities might affect US politics.

  • Holiday gift guide 2010: DVDs for the family

    Holiday gift guide 2010: DVDs for the family

    Now that we're fully into the holiday shopping season, Monitor staff writers have compiled a list of items you might consider as Christmas or Hanukkah gifts. We begin with some family-friendly DVDs. Each item has a link to amazon.com, where you can purchase the item and help support the Christian Science Monitor at the same time.

 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.