All list articles

  • Political misquotes: The 10 most famous things never actually said

    Political misquotes: The 10 most famous things never actually said

    Captain Kirk never said "Beam me up, Scotty!" Ilsa Laszlow never said, "Play it again, Sam," and Sherlock Holmes never said, "Elementary, my dear Watson." But these misquotes remain firmly lodged in the public consciousness, even though they appear nowhere in the original works. The same is true for things "said" – that is, widely attributed to, but not actually said – by political figures. Sometimes a misquote is cooked up by opponents or parodists as a way of discrediting or mocking the figure. Sometimes a line is attributed to a widely admired person as a way of making it sound more authoritative, like when someone co-signs a loan. And sometimes it's just a mistake. Here are 10 of the most widely believed – but completely bogus – things ever "said" by political figures.

  • Gmail breach: Eight tips to protect your e-mail account

    Gmail breach: Eight tips to protect your e-mail account

    The news this week of a hacker attack against hundreds of prominent users of Google Mail has served up a reminder: The security of digital information is often tenuous, despite many safeguards now in place. What can you do to protect against an invasion of personal information? Here are tips from Google and other privacy experts to make a data breach less likely:

  • Yemen 101: Who's who in the escalating conflict

    Yemen 101: Who's who in the escalating conflict

    As Yemen’s crisis escalates, President Ali Abdullah Saleh is battling opponents on multiple fronts who have diverse backgrounds and agendas. Here's a rundown of the players you need to know in order to understand the unrest in Yemen.

  • Election 101: Nine facts about Mitt Romney and his White House bid

    Election 101: Nine facts about Mitt Romney and his White House bid

    Mitt Romney, who declared his candidacy June 2 in New Hampshire, has been groomed to run for president. He has the look and the political lineage. He’s been a governor, the quintessential training ground. And he’s essentially never stopped running since he conceded his first White House bid three years ago.

  • Bestselling books the week of 6/2/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 6/2/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Jerusalem Day: Why the Holy City is at the crux of the peace process

    Jerusalem Day: Why the Holy City is at the crux of the peace process

    Today is Jerusalem Day in Israel, the anniversary of the day in the 1967 war when Israel took the Old City and East Jerusalem from Jordan. More than 40 years later, Jerusalem remains one of the largest hurdles to resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Israel insists Jerusalem is its ‘undivided and eternal’ capital while Palestinians insist on securing a capital in East Jerusalem. Here are three reasons why Jerusalem is so important to both sides.

  • 7 best books of June: Amazon editors' favorite picks

    7 best books of June: Amazon editors' favorite picks

    Some of this summer's most interesting books will taken you traveling: from suburban Vermont to 19th-century Paris, from the sweltering Amazon to 1950s communist China, and from psychological thriller to sci-fi apocalypse. Here are seven of the titles that drew the most enthusiastic thumbs-up from the editors at Amazon.com.

  • Ratko Mladic: 5 reasons the 'Hague Hilton' is no San Quentin

    Ratko Mladic: 5 reasons the 'Hague Hilton' is no San Quentin

    Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian Serb Army leader who is considered responsible for the Srebrenica massacre, arrived in The Hague Tuesday. He will be placed in the same detention center as the others facing trial in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). Mr. Mladic faces the prospect of spending the rest of his life in detention, but as detention centers go, the 'Hague Hilton,' as it is sometimes called, may not be such a bad place to stay.

  • 3 new fiction titles from award-winning novelists

    3 new fiction titles from award-winning novelists

    Aside from the fact that they are all third novels by award-winning novelists, this month's fiction roundup offers plenty of variety – from a dark fable set on the coast of Newfoundland to a portrait of a Midwestern family in flux to a journalistic thriller set in Nigeria.

  • Commencement 2011: what 10 eminent speakers told graduates

    Commencement 2011: what 10 eminent speakers told graduates

    "Follow your bliss." "You can be whatever you want to be." "Never give up." Google reveals those three platitudes to be the ones most often spoken at commencements, according to Richard Stengel, managing editor of Time magazine. Many speakers, however – including Mr. Stengel – offered more insightful advice to college graduates this spring. Here are the Monitor's hand-picked highlights from the 2011 season.

  • 15 recipes for outdoor dining

    15 recipes for outdoor dining

    Summer is the season of eating outdoors. Typically, that means food that is either grilled or packed into portable containers and served cold. From the Monitor's archives, here is a list of 15 recipes – some exotic, some traditional, and all delectable – to help you prepare for your next picnic, barbecue, or day at the beach.

  • 11 excellent novels for summer reading

    11 excellent novels for summer reading

    Whether you're on the beach, in the airport, or staying in your own backyard, there's nothing like the perfect novel to round out your summer vacation. Here are a handful of very attractive titles appearing this summer.

  • 20 of the smartest nonfiction titles for summer reading

    20 of the smartest nonfiction titles for summer reading

    Some of this summer's best books will introduce you to Machu Picchu, hippie physicists, Parisian walks, and a serial imposter. And that’s just the nonfiction.

  • Memorial Day tuneup: Top 5 easiest car repairs

    Memorial Day tuneup: Top 5 easiest car repairs

    Memorial Day is the start of the summer driving season. Before you drop off your car at the local mechanic to get it in tip top shape, consider saving some money by performing these basic maintenance repairs yourself. I know what you're thinking: Grease? Auto parts all over the garage? Don’t worry. I got together with our expert mechanic team at AutoMD.com to come up with car repairs that are so easy, just about anyone can do them while keeping their hands (mostly) clean. The average car owner should be able to complete all five jobs in about an hour and save nearly $200. Here are our Top 5 easiest auto repairs:

  • Who is Ratko Mladic? Four key questions answered.

    Who is Ratko Mladic? Four key questions answered.

    Bosnian Serb military leader Ratko Mladic was arrested Thursday in Serbia, more than a decade after a warrant was issued for his arrest for his involvement in the Bosnian war of the 1990s. He was indicted by the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia for crimes against humanity, genocide, and war crimes in 1995 and the international arrest warrant soon followed.

  • Bestselling books the week of 5/26/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 5/26/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Libya's rebels come to Washington. Who else has offered support?

    Libya’s rebel government, the Transitional National Council, today accepted a US invitation to set up shop in Washington. But the offer did not come with US recognition of the council as Libya’s sole legitimate representative. Here’s how the US gesture compares with three other countries:

  • Are you middle class? Take our quiz to find out.

    Are you middle class? Take our quiz to find out.

    It's undeniable the middle class is growing in China, Brazil and India. But in the US, the term "middle class," is notoriously vague. Almost everyone, it seems, identifies themselves as middle class, regardless of wealth, income, profession, or education. That's why most politicians will describe policies they oppose as "punishing the middle class" and policies that they support as "helping the middle class." One popular definition, provided by The Drum Major Institute for Public Policy, identifies American families as middle class if they have incomes between $25,000 and $100,000 each year. That's a wide spread, but a perhaps a useful one: If you see someone who makes $75,000 a year more than you as belonging to your class, you're much less likely to revolt against them. But is it true? Grab a pencil and piece of paper – or a Mont Blanc pen and some embossed gold floral deckle edge stationery – and take our quiz to find out where you stand in America's socioeconomic pecking order.

  • Joplin tornado: Will it be one of the Top 5 costliest?

    Joplin tornado: Will it be one of the Top 5 costliest?

    Joplin tornado, as Sunday's twister has come to be called, is blamed for more than 100 fatalities in the southwest Missouri community. It's the latest in a string of tornadoes this spring. Though hurricanes and earthquakes tend to do more financial damage per event, tornadoes and related events have been responsible for an average 57 percent of all insured catastrophe losses in the United States since 1953, according to a 2009 study by insurance credit-rating service A.M. Best. Not counting the Joplin tornado, where damage assessments have only begun, here’s a look at the five most financially devastating tornadoes in the US, according to the A.M. Best study and federal estimates (reported in 2011 dollars):

  • Five ways Moneygall is welcoming Obama 'home' to Ireland

    Five ways Moneygall is welcoming Obama 'home' to Ireland

    President Barack Obama put the little town of Moneygall, Ireland, with its population of approximately 300, on the map today. A local religious leader discovered Obama’s roots could be traced to a great-great-great grandfather believed to have been baptized at his church there. Mr. Obama’s visit today sent the town into a flurry of preparation (and gimmicks) in honor of its famous “son” – arguably the most powerful man in the world. Here are some highlights of that prep:

  • Election 101: Tim Pawlenty as 'everyman's' candidate? Ten points about who he is.

    Election 101: Tim Pawlenty as 'everyman's' candidate? Ten points about who he is.

    Tim Pawlenty wants a White House ending to his rags-to-riches rise. The former governor declared his candidacy for president May 22 in a video released on his website. The grandson of German immigrants and the first in his family to attend college, Pawlenty is hoping his foes’ flaws are his ticket to victory.

  • Election 101: Herman Cain

    Election 101: Herman Cain

    Herman Cain, who announced his candidacy for president at an Atlanta rally May 21, aims to bring a new slogan to the White House: “Yes, We Cain!” Seriously, folks. The pizza magnate, aka the ‘Hermanator,’ is staging a full-on charm offensive, hoping his Southern-fried charisma, business savvy, top performance in the first GOP debate, and media prowess are enough to offset his fundamental flaw: zero political experience.

  • Strauss-Kahn house arrest: Five celebrities who know what it's like

    Strauss-Kahn house arrest: Five celebrities who know what it's like

    Former IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn has been remanded to home confinement as he awaits trial on attempted rape charges. Here are five other headline-catching cases of house arrest.

  • Obama's speech: Five ways Netanyahu can respond

    Obama's speech: Five ways Netanyahu can respond

    Faced with the Arab Spring, a Palestinian statehood push at the UN, President Barack Obama's Middle East policy speech May 19, and jittery constituents at home, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is under pressure to make a decisive move. Here are five options.

  • The top 10 books of all time

    The top 10 books of all time

    Readers of books love lists. That's why book-review editor J. Peder Zane asked 125 writers – everyone from Norman Mailer to Jonathan Franzen to Margaret Drabble – to pick their very favorite books of all time. Out of all the books in the world, here are the 10 most selected by Zane's illustrious group. (You can see this and other book lists in Zane's book "The Top Ten: Writers Pick Their Favorite Books.")