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  • Affordable colleges: a new tool for cost comparison

    Affordable colleges: a new tool for cost comparison

    Affordable colleges might be easier to track down now with a new online tool out from the US Department of Education, which compares the cost of attending different kinds of institutions. We put together a list of the most and least expensive 4-year or longer institutions, in three categories: public institutions, not-for-profit institutions, and for-profit institutions. Prices are based on the "net cost" of each, which is the average price after grants or scholarship aid is subtracted from the total cost of attendance. Often, the average net cost is quite different from an institution's listed tuition. The numbers here are based on costs for the 2008-2009 academic year.

  • Elections 101: Ten facts about Thaddeus McCotter and his run for president

    Elections 101: Ten facts about Thaddeus McCotter and his run for president

    Thaddeus McCotter, the GOP’s surprise dark horse, is stirring up the race. The five-term Michigan congressman declared his candidacy for president on July 2 in his home state. A Beatles-loving, guitar-playing son of the heartland, Representative McCotter has strong conservative credentials and populist appeal. But there’s a problem. Thaddeus who?

  • Strauss-Kahn and five other vexing sexual assault cases

    Strauss-Kahn and five other vexing sexual assault cases

    Sexual assault cases rank among the most difficult to prosecute, as the one against ex-IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn is demonstrating. Held under house arrest since being charged with sexual assault of a maid at a New York hotel, the French politician was released on his own recognizance Friday amid questions about his accuser’s credibility. The “he said, she said” nature of such cases is one complicating factor (as is getting victims to report sexual assaults in the first place). But so are prosecutorial zeal, power politics, personal troubles of accusers, and even false accusation. Here are five high-profile sex-crime cases that fell apart, in which one or more of those factors played a role.

  • Top 7 detective series set in foreign locales

    Top 7 detective series set in foreign locales

    Two of the most popular summer book genres are mystery and travel, and there's no better way to enjoy both than by reading detective novels set in foreign locations. Check out this list to learn about seven series that will keep you on the edge of your beach chair – all summer long.

  • Top 5 credit cards for world travel

    Top 5 credit cards for world travel

    Is world travel on your horizon this year? Bringing the right credit card is as fundamental as packing the right wardrobe. While there are great benefits to using plastic abroad – such as travel assistance and fraud protection – the cards’ foreign transaction fees can eat into your travel budget. And traditional magnetic strip credit cards aren't universally accepted overseas anymore. Picking the right card for a foreign trip depends on the perks you’re looking for, the fees you’re willing to pay, and the kind of credit you have. Here are Credit Karma’s Top 5 credit cards for world travel:

  • Robert Gates' last day at Pentagon: three reasons he'll be missed

    Robert Gates' last day at Pentagon: three reasons he'll be missed

    If Defense Secretary Robert Gates feels any twinge of wistfulness when he departs the Pentagon on Thursday, it probably won't last long. Even during the Bush years, Mr. Gates spoke often of the clock in his office by which he counted down the days until he could retire to his beloved Washington State. When President Obama asked him to stay on as defense secretary, Gates made no secret that he did so out of public duty, not an affinity for Washington, D.C. But Washington insiders certainly had an affinity for Gates. Here are three reasons America’s longest-serving secretary of Defense will be missed – and legacies that many hope will last after he's gone.

  • Your teens have summer jobs? Three financial lessons to teach.

    Your teens have summer jobs? Three financial lessons to teach.

    This summer, many teens are working summer jobs and, perhaps for the first time, earning money that doesn’t’ come from family. It’s an exciting feeling of independence – and a key time to learn the basics of money management. That’s where parents come in. Even if communicating with your teenagers about money is sometimes difficult, it is natural for you to be involved because their income from summer jobs will have tax implications for you. Here are three easy financial lessons to teach your teens this summer:

  • Top 5 states for business

    Top 5 states for business

    The economy may be looking better for some states this year, but budget woes are a challenge from east to west. In its fifth annual ranking of America’s Top States for Business, CNBC for the first time took into account state budget gaps among the 43 metrics that go into its rankings. That made for some interesting changes this year, with last year's Nos. 1, 3, and 5 states falling while other states climbed in rank. Here are the Top 5 states for business:

  • Bestselling books the week of 6/30/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 6/30/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America?

  • Book club alert: 3 great novels for summer reading

    Book club alert: 3 great novels for summer reading

    From Dodge City to Shanghai to a summer home in Maine, here are three of our favorite fiction recommendations for good summer reading.

  • Top 10 books of 2011, according to Amazon's editors

    Top 10 books of 2011, according to Amazon's editors

    Amazon's editors pick their top 10 books of the year so far.

  • The best movies to watch this summer with your family.

    The best movies to watch this summer with your family.

    For some quality bonding time with your family this summer, pop in one of these family classics from the last decade that are sure to delight toddlers, teens, and parents alike.

  • ICC issues Qaddafi warrant: Key prosecutions of world leaders

    ICC issues Qaddafi warrant: Key prosecutions of world leaders

    The International Criminal Court issued international arrest warrants today for Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi, his son Saif al-Islam Qaddafi, and intelligence chief Abdullah Senussi, charging them with crimes against humanity in the early weeks of Libya's uprising. It is only the second-ever international arrest warrant for a sitting head of state and the inquiry that preceded it was one of only a handful into crimes committed by world leaders. Below, a look at prosecution of current and past world leaders:

  • Cambodia: Khmer Rouge tribunal 101

    Cambodia: Khmer Rouge tribunal 101

    The Khmer Rouge ruled Cambodia from 1975 until 1979 and is blamed for the deaths of 1.7 million people. The Maoist group tried to build an agrarian society purged of foreign influences. Until now, none of its senior cadre has gone on trial, and Pol Pot, its paramount leader, died in 1998 in a jungle camp after losing power to Vietnamese occupiers. The Khmer Rouge tribunal, a joint effort between Cambodia’s judiciary and the United Nations, opened in 2006 and has so far spent more than $100 million on investigating and trying surviving members of the senior leadership. Only one has been prosecuted and found guilty. Here are five frequently asked questions answered:

  • Designer clothes at consignment store prices? Five shopping tips.

    Designer clothes at consignment store prices? Five shopping tips.

    During these tough economic times, saving money on clothing and accessories is important. Shopping in consignment stores is one way to do it. You can get high quality designer clothes at affordable prices – sometimes, ridiculously affordable. I once bought a Chanel jacket for $4. The retail price for a brand new one: $1,500. Here are five tips to find designer clothes at consignment store prices:

  • Who will carry out Obama's Afghanistan exit plan? Three new guys.

    Who will carry out Obama's Afghanistan exit plan? Three new guys.

    After President Obama outlines his strategy Wednesday for winding down the 10-year war in Afghanistan – including the rate of US troop withdrawals – it will be the duty of three men, all new in their roles, to get it done. It will be a tough job, and there is likely to be plenty of second-guessing not only about the strategy itself, but also their handling of it, from Congress, pundits, and ex-military types. Here are some clues into what priorities these three defense leaders might set and a look at the particular skills each brings to the task of managing America’s longest war.

  • Mexico's most powerful drug cartels

    Mexico's most powerful drug cartels

    Mexico declared a major victory Tuesday when it arrested the leader of the La Familia drug gang and 50 of its members, calling the group finished after the arrests. But the deadly drug war in Mexico is far from over. Many experts expect the remaining La Familia members to join allied groups and for its territory to be absorbed by other traffickers. Here’s a look at Mexico’s most powerful drug cartels:

  • Gay marriage in the US: six ways states differ on the issue

    Gay marriage in the US: six ways states differ on the issue

    The early February ruling by a federal appeals court in California—that Proposition 8, the ban on same-sex marriage, is unconstitutional—reveals that gay marriage in the US is more than just a black and white issue. Officially, the federal government does not recognize same-sex marriage, but some individual states do. And plenty more have laws or constitutional amendments that offer limited rights to same-sex couples. Take a look at where states currently stand on gay marriage in the US.

  • A sampler of books on Syria

    A sampler of books on Syria

    As pro-democracy activists continue to battle the government of Bashar al-Assad, Syria looks likely to remain in the headlines for weeks and months to come. For those hoping to better understand one of the most influential countries in the current Mideast power dynamic, here are six books – a mix of literature, history, and politics – that offer insight.

  • New York gay marriage bill: What would happen if it passes?

    New York gay marriage bill: What would happen if it passes?

    New York legislators could vote as early as Wednesday to legalize gay marriage in the state. New York would become the sixth state (plus Washington, D.C.) to permit gay marriage, and the third to approve it via a legislative bill and not a court decision. With gay marriage in California in legal limbo, it would also become the most populous state with gay marriage, potentially influencing legislators in other states, such as Maryland and Rhode Island. As a gay marriage vote inches closer in New York, here’s a list six things that would – and wouldn’t – happen should the bill pass.

  • Bestselling books the week of 6/23/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 6/23/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America?

  • Election 101: Ten facts about Jon Huntsman and his presidential campaign

    Election 101: Ten facts about Jon Huntsman and his presidential campaign

    Jon Meade Huntsman Jr. wants his boss's job. President Obama’s former China ambassador declared his candidacy for the presidency on June 21. Dubbed “the Republican Democrats fear most,” the tall, handsome, cerebral former governor of Utah often draws comparisons to Mr. Obama, the very man he’s struggling to distance himself from. Will that, and his centrist views and Mormon faith, keep him on the margins of the Republican field?

  • Existing home sales dip, but prices vary wildly. Top 5 most, least expensive cities.

    Existing home sales dip, but prices vary wildly. Top 5 most, least expensive cities.

    Existing home sales dipped below an annual rate of 5 million in May. Not counting condos and coops, single-family home sales stand at 4.2 million a year, which, if it held for all of 2011, would be lower than the worst of the slump in 2008. But home prices vary dramatically, depending upon where you live in the United States: the average listing for a typical four-bedroom, two bathroom house in the most expensive real-estate market is more than 40 times the average listing in the least expensive city, according to a recent survey of more than 2,300 markets by Coldwell Banker Real Estate. Here are the Top 5 most and least expensive cities. Is yours on the list?

  • How can Congress cut $2.4 trillion? Here are three places to start.

    How can Congress cut $2.4 trillion? Here are three places to start.

    As an Aug. 2 deadline for raising the debt ceiling nears, Congress is getting serious about where to find major spending cuts. Republicans have vowed not to support a potential $2.4 trillion increase to the debt ceiling unless they get an equal amount of budget savings to offset the increase. Finding $2.4 trillion in spending cuts is not easy, but Congress's search is beginning to show some signs of promise. In particular, three programs long protected by big, bipartisan majorities in the past now appear vulnerable.

  • 10 books to read before you go to Italy this summer

    10 books to read before you go to Italy this summer

    It seems that new travel guides to Italy are being published every five minutes or so. But for those who want to keep it simple, here are the handful of absolute must-read books – three classic novels included – that no tourist to Italy should ever be without.

 
 
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