All list articles

  • Five controversial Jewish neighborhoods in East Jerusalem

    Five controversial Jewish neighborhoods in East Jerusalem

    In 2000, then-President Bill Clinton suggested that one of the thorniest issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict – the division of Jerusalem to create two capitals for two states – should be decided along demographic lines. In other words, Jewish neighborhoods would be incorporated into Israel and Arab neighborhoods would become part of the future Palestinian state. The past decade has seen a significant expansion of Jewish areas in the Arab neighborhoods closest to the Old City, which could affect how the city is divided – or prevent it from being divided at all. This has raised the ire of Palestinians, the United Nations, and others, because the expansion has taken place in a territory that Israel occupied and then unilaterally annexed – and thus the transfer of civilian populations is considered illegal under international law. Here are five of the most controversial developments:

  • Redistricting 101: Eight facts about redrawing the US political map

    Redistricting 101: Eight facts about redrawing the US political map

    Every 10 years, everyone in the United States gets counted – all 308,745,538 of them, according to the 2010 Census. The number of representatives in Congress, however, stays at 435. Dividing the larger number by the smaller gives the average number of people in each congressional district (now 709,760). But Americans move around a lot – for new jobs or better weather, to be closer to family, or just for the adventure. As a result, the boundaries of those congressional districts have to shift to make sure that each district has as close to the same number of people as possible. And that shifting can have important political, economic, and social consequences. That’s what ‘redistricting’ is all about.

  • Five House controversies from Week 1: Did Republicans break promises?

    Five House controversies from Week 1: Did Republicans break promises?

    House Republicans swept back into power this week promising to fix how the institution functions. Speaker John Boehner called for a renewed focus on the Constitution, more openness and accountability, and resolving 'honest differences through a fair debate and vote.' Here’s a look at the Republicans' first week back in charge.

  • 5 novels for the new year

    5 novels for the new year

    If you're a fiction reader, you are going to want to pick up at least one of these early 2011 novels.

  • Job market's still tough. Seven ways to reenergize your job search.

    Job market's still tough. Seven ways to reenergize your job search.

    For America's jobless, the labor market is sending conflicting signals. On one hand, unemployment in December dropped to 9.4 percent, its lowest rate in 19 months, the US Department of Labor reported Friday. On the other hand, a separate Labor survey showed that the economy added only 103,000 jobs, when economists were expecting about 150,000 new nonfarm jobs. What to make of it all? In fits and starts, the economy is staging a very modest recovery, but it may take years before the nation regains the jobs it lost during the Great Recession. To find a job, many unemployed Americans may need to reenergize their own job search. Here are seven ways to do it:

  • Deals of the week: toy rebate, freebies, and getting paid to shop

    Deals of the week: toy rebate, freebies, and getting paid to shop

    Is saving more money one of your goals in 2011? It is for me! I’m excited to see so many great offers immediately in the new year. Start your year off right with these great deals from Yoplait, Friday’s restaurants, Post-It Tabs, Bath & Body Works, Pampers, Hasbro toys, and (starting Sunday) CVS.

  • 5 Elvis biographies to read on his birthday

    5 Elvis biographies to read on his birthday

    Jan. 8, 2011, marks the 76th birthday of Elvis Presley. In remembrance of "the King," we suggest that you put on your blue suede shoes and pick up one of these books.

  • See how a video game outsold the top movie, book, and DVD

    See how a video game outsold the top movie, book, and DVD

    Few companies enjoy paydays quite like Activision's. In November, the video-game publisher released Call of Duty: Black Ops, a cold-war military thriller that not only became the most lucrative game launch ever, but also made more money in 24 hours than any book, movie, or album in entertainment history.

  • Bestselling books the week of 1/6/2011, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 1/6/2011, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Egypt's Copts: A closer look at Coptic Christianity

    Egypt's Copts: A closer look at Coptic Christianity

    Egyptian Copts have been thrust into the global spotlight since a New Year’s attack on a Coptic church in Alexandria, Egypt, killed more than 20 people. Though often overlooked in a predominantly Muslim region, the Coptic Orthodox Church is the main Christian denomination in Egypt, with more than 7 million Copts.

  • Food safety law: Six ways it will make food safer

    Food safety law: Six ways it will make food safer

    With the stroke of a pen, President Obama on Tuesday inaugurated the biggest reform in food safety in years. The Food Safety Modernization Act contains changes in rules and procedures that only a bureaucrat could love. Some Republicans threaten to prevent funding its reforms. Still, the law has unusually broad support in Congress, the food industry, and consumer groups. Here are its Top 6 reforms, which will make your food safer:

  • Five ways Republicans will change the House

    Five ways Republicans will change the House

    The US House of Representatives rewrites its own internal rules every two years, and House Republicans are proposing sweeping rules changes to limit the cost and scope of government, increase openness, and make it easier to cut taxes. The rules package will face a vote when the new Congress convenes on Jan. 5. It typically passes on a party-line vote without amendment. These new rules include:

  • What to read? 3 intriguing memoirs for early 2011

    What to read? 3 intriguing memoirs for early 2011

    From Shangri-La to Brooklyn, here are three promising memoirs due for release in the early months of 2011.

  • Top 5 Google Labs projects

    Top 5 Google Labs projects

    In the 1990s, many people knew the Internet by a different name: AOL. America Online was the lens through which millions viewed the Web. At the time, there was little reason to look anywhere else. In 2011, Google has come perhaps the closest to once again luring people into a single vision of the Internet – from Google search and YouTube to Gmail and Android phones. To keep people in the Google way of life, the company constantly launches new services. In fact, Google has an official "20 percent" rule that asks every employee to spend "one day a week working on projects that aren't necessarily in our job descriptions." These extracurricular experiments live at GoogleLabs.com, a self-described "playground" where anyone can try out the almost-finished projects. Recent alumni include Google Maps, Alerts, and its SMS text message directory service. The current collection showcases 50-plus "bubbling test tubes." There's no guarantee that any will graduate to full Google status, but here are five projects that are worth donning a virtual lab coat to test for yourself.

  • Jerry Brown's California: Five big changes from 1975 to 2011

    Jerry Brown's California: Five big changes from 1975 to 2011

    Once California’s youngest governor, Jerry Brown reprises his role as the state's chief executive starting Monday, now as the oldest person elected to that office. Then, as now, Brown replaced a Hollywood actor-gone-governor – Ronald Reagan in 1975 and Arnold Schwarzenegger now – and the top issue was high unemployment amid a sagging economy. Here's a look at California and Brown then and now.

  • Quadrantid meteor shower tonight: the top nine meteor showers of 2011

    Quadrantid meteor shower tonight: the top nine meteor showers of 2011

    This week will see a lesser known meteor shower, the Quadrantid, dazzle the night sky on Jan. 3 and 4. It's the first of nine significant meteor showers in 2011. Here’s a list of all the events and what to watch for each time.

  • Who are Egypt's Copts, and the Middle East's other Christian populations?

    Who are Egypt's Copts, and the Middle East's other Christian populations?

    Recent attacks against Christians in Egypt and Iraq have drawn attention to the Middle East's Christian populations, which are dwindling as Christians flee violence, political strife, and persecution. Christians made up more than 20 percent of the region's population in the early 20th century, but today, they make up less than 10 percent. Here is a look at the status of Christians in seven key countries, from Egypt to Iran.

  • What to read? 8 noteworthy biographies coming in early 2011

    What to read? 8 noteworthy biographies coming in early 2011

    The new year holds the promise of a fresh crop of intriguing titles. Here are eight biographies likely to attract attention in the new year.

  • What to read? 15 promising titles for early 2011

    What to read? 15 promising titles for early 2011

    There's no better way to face the new year than with a good book in hand. Here are 15 promising-looking nonfiction books, all due for release early in 2011.

  • Top 5 business deals of 2010 that hit your pocketbook

    Top 5 business deals of 2010 that hit your pocketbook

    The past year has produced some of the most intriguing business deals of the decade, which boosted (or sunk) the fortunes of CEOs and shareholders alike. Perhaps the most relevant question, however, is what impact these transactions will have on consumers? Here are the Top 5 deals of 2010 that, for better or worse, will change the way you spend your money.

  • 2011 predictions: interest rates around the world

    2011 predictions: interest rates around the world

    Currency analysts pay obsessive attention to economic factors that indicate the direction of interest rates, because interest rates represent the price of a currency. Any price change has a direct impact on the currency’s value. That can mean huge gains or losses for currency traders, but it also has a big impact on what savers earn, borrowers pay, consumers shell out for imported goods, and global companies plan in terms of compensation and hiring. In 2010, the stress on various currencies became clear, causing many central banks to push interest rates to record lows. Here’s a look at how those forces could play out in 2011 in six major regions of the world:

  • Education reform: eight school chiefs to watch in 2011

    Education reform: eight school chiefs to watch in 2011

    Education reform will be on many state education agendas across the nation in 2011. The past year saw Republicans elected or appointed to top state education posts in many states. But a bipartisan group of veteran education leaders has also stepped up to call for more dramatic change in how schools operate. Here’s a sampling of state education leaders to watch:

  • New Year's Eve 2011 around the world

    New Year's Eve 2011 around the world

    Much of the US will be tuning into the Times Square ball drop in New York City, but there are celebrations to rival that one around the world. Below are some of the world's biggest New Year's Eve celebrations.

  • From marijuana to 'sexting': new laws set to take effect Jan. 1

    From marijuana to 'sexting': new laws set to take effect Jan. 1

    In all, 45 states, the District of Columbia, Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico passed 31,005 new laws in 2010. Some of them will come into effect with the new year. Here is a sampling of some of the trends in lawmaking in 2010.

  • Eggs. Shrek glasses. Sure, but what was the top recall of 2010?

    Eggs. Shrek glasses. Sure, but what was the top recall of 2010?

    It was a year when contaminated eggs and McDonald's glasses found their way into the headlines. But the product fiascos of 2010 included everything from recalled cars and home appliances to food and medications. What was the year’s top recall? Read on:

 
 
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