All list articles

  • 10 best books of October, according to Amazon's editors

    10 best books of October, according to Amazon's editors

    College seniors struggling with life and love, a newly freed sex offender, and four women living through the Roman conquests are only a few of the colorful characters scattered through the 10 October books that Amazon's editors picked as their favorites. Here are the books the Amazon editors read and loved.

  • Four reasons why illegal immigration across the US-Mexico border has dropped

    Four reasons why illegal immigration across the US-Mexico border has dropped

    From 1970 to 2010, more than 10 million Mexicans migrated to the US. Now, after decades of rising numbers immigrating to the US, a new demographic trend is playing out: illegal immigration is waning. The Department of Homeland Security said in a 2010 report that the number of immigrants residing unauthorized in the US, 62 percent of whom come from Mexico, has declined from a peak of 11.8 million in January of 2007 to 10.8 million in January of 2010. US Customs and Border Protection also released data showing that the number of those arrested trying to cross the border illegally is is down sharply – by 58 percent since fiscal year 2006. The Pew Hispanic Center, using Mexican government data, estimates that the number of Mexicans annually leaving Mexico for the US declined by 60 percent from 2006 to 2010. Many dispute the reason why. Here are four factors that play a role.

  • Student loan forgiveness: 5 ways Obama wants to ease student debt

    Student loan forgiveness: 5 ways Obama wants to ease student debt

    Student loan forgiveness is on the minds of many. The class of 2011 has received the unwelcome distinction of becoming the most indebted graduating class ever and student loan debt overall is expected to hit $1 trillion. Here are five ways the White House and the Department of Education plan to ease the burden:

  • What is Somalia's Al Shabab?

    The international community has more questions than answers about the Somali militant group Al Shabab, the target of Kenya's military incursion into Somalia. But they know how it affords food for its troops – and it's not from piracy.

  • Bestselling books the week of 10/27/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 10/27/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • 10 terrific pieces of advice – from celebrities to their teenage selves

    10 terrific pieces of advice – from celebrities to their teenage selves

    If only you'd known.... in the new book "Dear Me," edited by Joseph Galliano, celebrities give advice to themselves at age 16. Some of the letters are funny ("Calculus. Trust me. You'll never use it," writes Jodi Picoult) and others are poignant ("Keep listening to that inner voice. It will carry you," Rose McGowan tells her 16-year-old self). Here are some of the best.

  • Tired of 'Twilight' clones? 5 young adult books to try instead

    Tired of 'Twilight' clones? 5 young adult books to try instead

    For those who browse young adult shelves, the choices may be starting to blur: girl meets supernatural boy, then must choose between two boys. Or – for a little variety – supernatural girl meets human boy, then must choose between two boys. Vampires, fairies, angels – they're all over the young adult section. So, in the spirit of Teen Read Week, here are five gripping young adult titles that manage to keep otherworldly creatures and dramatic love triangles well out of sight.

  • Five surprising facts from the new Steve Jobs biography

    Five surprising facts from the new Steve Jobs biography

    Steve Jobs, the man who put the "i" in technology, was a fascinating character who continues to inspire and confound. Why the black turtlenecks? How did he foresee (create?) the iPhone revolution? What was the secret to his presentation style? Walter Isaacson's new book "Steve Jobs," which just hit stores, attempts to answer these questions. The 571-page biography released on Oct. 24 to glowing reviews. The author conducted more than 100 interviews for the book – including more than 40 with the Apple CEO himself. Here are five of key excerpts.

  • Top 5 targets of Occupy Wall Street

    Top 5 targets of Occupy Wall Street

    Inspired by a provocation in a July blog by Canadian activist group Adbusters, who in turn took their cues from the Arab Spring demonstrations, Occupy Wall Street has taken on epic proportions – and even more epic targets. In the crosshairs of this band of tent-dwelling rabblerousers are nothing less than the pillars of society.

  • Top 7 dumb times to use a smartphone

    Top 7 dumb times to use a smartphone

    Smartphones are great. Who would have ever thought that you could carry a telephone, address book, computer, camera, and all of your e-mail in just your pocket? However, as with any technology, it's liable to be misused. This isn’t just limited to talking on the phone at the wrong time; typing on the keyboard or sneaking a glance at the latest text messages can get us into a lot of trouble, too. Here are my Top 7 dumbest moments to use a smartphone:

  • Five things you need to know about 'the cloud'

    Five things you need to know about 'the cloud'

    When the Apple iPhone 4S and Amazon Kindle Fire tablet debuted this fall, the tech press blogged breathlessly about how these new devices harness 'the cloud.' Menacing as this hazy tech term may sound, the cloud is actually a regular part of daily digital life. In fact, gadget analysts expect this metaphorical cloud to envelop more of the world in coming years.

  • Six ways the rich really do get richer

    Six ways the rich really do get richer

    “Class warfare:” Lately this old term has been taking on new life as political theater, a way to rebuke Wall Street protestors, and, predictably, fodder for Fox News. According to Google, in just the last month alone, 3,870 articles have been published containing these words. Another way to express the concept of rich vs. not-so-rich is the expression, “The rich get richer and the poor get poorer.” It’s been around for a long time: According to Wikipedia, William Henry Harrison went there in 1840: “I believe and I say it is true Democratic feeling, that all the measures of the government are directed to the purpose of making the rich richer and the poor poorer.” I’m not going to take a stand on either side of the “class warfare” debate by saying that the rich do or don’t take unfair advantage of the rest of society. This is America, where we all have the potential to become rich. But I will say this unequivocally: The rich do get richer, or at least have the potential to. Let’s count the ways:

  • Top 25 International Relations master's degree programs

    Top 25 International Relations master's degree programs

    According to The College of William & Mary's Teaching, Research, and International Policy (TRIP) project's most recent survey of international relations (IR) faculty:

  • Syria's neighbors: How 5 border nations are reacting to Assad's crackdown

    Syria's neighbors: How 5 border nations are reacting to Assad's crackdown

    Lebanon’s Syria-backed government has tried to distance itself from the upheaval next door, fearful of the repercussions if the violence worsens or if the Assad regime collapses. But the other four countries with that share borders with Syria have reacted in different ways to the seven-month uprising, reflecting their respective regional heft and national interests.

  • A brief history of the Greek debt crisis

    A brief history of the Greek debt crisis

    The Greek debt crisis has unfolded over several years and through a litany of bailouts, parliamentary votes, and credit downgrades. Here is a brief overview of how we got to where we stand today.

  • Herman Cain speaks out: His seven most memorable one-liners

    Herman Cain speaks out: His seven most memorable one-liners

    For a man who once said he had majored in math but "never took a course in political correctness," Herman Cain's ascension in the Republican presidential campaign has been, if nothing else, rich with zingers. And if his time in the limelight has been any indication, he's just getting started. Take a look at seven of Mr. Cain's most memorable quotes.

  • Bestselling books the week of 10/20/11, according to IndieBound*

    Bestselling books the week of 10/20/11, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • 10 top favorite teen books of 2011

    10 top favorite teen books of 2011

    Just in time for Teen Read Week 2011, teens cast more than 10,000 votes to pick their favorite books in a contest sponsored by the Young Adult Library Services Association. What made it to No. 1?

  • Gilad Shalit deal: Which Palestinian prisoners will walk free?

    Gilad Shalit deal: Which Palestinian prisoners will walk free?

    Nearly 500 Palestinians are scheduled to be released by Israel Tuesday in an exchange for soldier Gilad Shalit. Here’s the status of seven well-known prisoners (See the whole list here):

  • Herman Cain's 9-9-9 plan: What would your sales tax be?

    Herman Cain's 9-9-9 plan: What would your sales tax be?

    Herman Cain has vaulted into the top tier of GOP presidential candidates with his 9-9-9 tax plan, which would create a new 9 percent federal sales tax. But consumers would have to pay that sales tax on top of existing state and local sales taxes. Here are figures from the nonpartisan Tax Foundation that look at the total sales taxes in every state, adding up the state sales tax, a statewide average of the various local sales-tax rates, and the 9-9-9 federal sales tax.

  • Six things you probably didn't know about Ayn Rand

    Six things you probably didn't know about Ayn Rand

    Nearly 30 years after her passing, Ayn Rand is experiencing a renaissance as the economy sputters and government efforts to spur growth fall short. With over 25 million copies of her books in print, including “Atlas Shrugged” and “The Fountainhead,” Ms. Rand had a history of engaging groups of dedicated followers on her small government, free market, and individualist philosophy. Now, she's gaining fans among tea party activists and others worried about the spread of government. Here are six things even her fans probably didn’t know about her:

  • Cinema Eye's finalists for best 2012 nonfiction film

    Cinema Eye's finalists for best 2012 nonfiction film

    Eleven films are finalists for the Cinema Eye Honor for Outstanding Achievement in Nonfiction Short Filmmaking for 2012, with the films coming from six different countries. What will make the cut when the finalists are narrowed down to five on Oct. 26?

  • Gap closing: Five stores that are poised to fill in the Gap

    Gap closing: Five stores that are poised to fill in the Gap

    Gap Inc.,the clothing retailer that runs the Gap, Old Navy, and Banana Republic retail chains, announced Thursday that it would be closing 189 Gap locations across North America by the end of 2013. At the same time, Gap is expanding its footprint overseas, opening a flagship store in Hong Kong and tripling its locations in China from 15 to 45. With Gap gradually taking its business elsewhere, which retailer will step in as the new go-to for the American shopper? Here are a few contenders:

  • Iran assassination plot: Four attacks that have been blamed on Iran

    Iran assassination plot: Four attacks that have been blamed on Iran

    For years, US officials have described Iran as the “most active” state sponsor of terror in the world. Many have been carried out by proxy forces, such as Lebanese Hezbollah, which was created by Iran’s Revolutionary Guard in 1982, so the exact nature of the role of the Islamic Republic, if any, often remains uncertain. Here’s a list of major terror attacks blamed on Iran in the past four decades.

  • 3 stand-out 2011 novels by award-winning writers

    3 stand-out 2011 novels by award-winning writers

    Three new works by three award-winning writers look at love, regret, and memory in this month's fiction roundup.