All list articles

  • Black Friday 2011: You can get deep discounts ... on that?

    Black Friday 2011: You can get deep discounts ... on that?

    Black Friday 2011 offers huge savings on popular holiday gift items, like televisions, gaming systems, laptops, clothing, and so on. But some retailers are using the traditional kickoff to the holiday shopping season to offer deals on stuff that's on (practically) no one's gift list. Here are our Top 6 wackiest product deals for Black Friday 2011. Have you got a better one? Let us know on Twitter or Facebook: 

  • 5 stories about Regis Philbin

    5 stories about Regis Philbin

    After a long career, Regis Philbin is saying goodbye to his morning show. In his new book "How I Got This Way" he writes about some of his many show biz memories. Here are five of the anecdotes the talk show host shares.

  • 6 of history's forgotten stories

    6 of history's forgotten stories

    Ever hear of the man who shot John Wilkes Booth or the "other Anne Frank" family? From Graeme Donald's "The Man Who Shot The Man Who Shot Lincoln," here are six stories that history forgot.

  • 6 novels that re-imagine history

    6 novels that re-imagine history

    You've heard of the butterfly effect: If one small event is different, all of history is changed forever. And it's a game people have loved to play for decades. What if the South had won the Civil War? What if Hitler had won World War II? What if Europe hadn't lasted beyond the Black Plague? Stephen King's new novel "11/22/63" imagines what would have happened if President Kennedy had lived beyond 1963, but he's not the first to rearrange history. Here's six novels that explore a slightly alternate version of very familiar events.

  • Iran nuclear program: 5 key sites

    Iran nuclear program: 5 key sites

    Iran’s nuclear program is the subject of constant scrutiny by the international community, particularly the United States and Israel. Here are five of Iran’s most important nuclear sites.

  • National Book Awards: the 2011 fiction nominees

    National Book Awards: the 2011 fiction nominees

    The 2011 National Book Award winners will be chosen tonight at 8 p.m at a black-tie ceremony in New York hosted by actor and author John Lithgow.  This year's nominees were not without controversy, most notably in the Young Adult category, where author Lauren Myracle was first erroneously listed as a nominee for her novel, “Shine” and then was asked to withdraw her nomination. (At Myracle's request, the National Book Foundation made a $5,000 donation to the Mathew Shephard Foundation in exchange.) In the adult fiction category, judges chose to honor some less-publicized books over some of the bigger “event” novels of the year, such as Ann Patchett's “State of Wonder” and Jeffrey Eugenides's “The Marriage Plot.”  Here's a look at the five finalists for the fiction prize.

  • What is a loya jirga? Afghanistan's most pivotal jirgas since 2002.

    What is a loya jirga? Afghanistan's most pivotal jirgas since 2002.

    A loya jirga, or grand assembly, is really just a traditional meeting that serves to bring local leaders from all over the country together to discuss a critical issue during a time of instability. While the meetings are seen as a critical part of Afghan political life, they are a relatively rare occurrence. In the past 300 years, Afghanistan has had fewer than 20 loya jirgas, about a quarter of which have taken place in the past decade. But as the Afghan political system grows stronger and develops democratic institutions such as the parliament, many now question their value altogether. Here are the four most pivotal jirgas of the past decade and what came out of the meetings:

  • Work at home: five tips to make it work for you

    Work at home: five tips to make it work for you

    More than 26 million Americans “telecommute” and all signs point to the virtual workforce growing even faster in coming years. Indeed, 56 percent of senior leaders and hiring managers at Fortune 500 companies believe that the number of work-at-home employees will steadily or greatly increase at their companies, according to a recent survey by WorkSimple. With unemployment so high, job-seekers could benefit from this growing at-home job market. The benefits are compelling: better work/life balance and significantly lower commuting and work costs. Here are five pointers to make work at home work for you – and for your company:

  • 8 things you learn from Diane Keaton's 'Then Again'

    8 things you learn from Diane Keaton's 'Then Again'

    'Annie Hall' and 'The Godfather' star Diane Keaton talks about growing up, getting into Hollywood, and her mother Dorothy, the "partner" Keaton credits for her success.

  • From 'blast boxers' to Golden-i: Five military gadgets that could change war

    From 'blast boxers' to Golden-i: Five military gadgets that could change war

    With billions of dollars at its disposal, the Pentagon is one of the incubators of technological innovation in the US. Here's a look at five new items of military technology that could add a little more James Bond to America's warfighters. 

  • Foreign students storm the US: Five facts about who they are

    Foreign students storm the US: Five facts about who they are

    International students flocked to US colleges and universities in record numbers in the 2010-11 academic year. The number surged nearly 5 percent over the previous year, reaching 723,277, according to the latest annual "Open Doors" report by the Institute of International Education and the State Department. The jump suggests a global hunger for the cachet and opportunity afforded by an American college education – despite the high cost to families and foreign governments. Foreign students contribute more than $21 billion to the US economy in tuition costs, book-buying, and living expenses – making higher education a top US service-sector export, the report finds. The makeup of international students in the US is changing in some surprising ways. Here are five.

  • 10 pieces of wisdom from Mindy Kaling

    10 pieces of wisdom from Mindy Kaling

    In her new book 'Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (And Other Concerns),' 'The Office' star and writer Mindy Kaling shares her thoughts on why she's not a natural babysitter and which types of women in romantic comedies don't actually exist in real life.

  • My top 5 lessons from hard times

    My top 5 lessons from hard times

    When I started looking for a job 75 years ago, there was record unemployment with little prospect for growth. Kids like me with college backgrounds were a dime a dozen. Times were so bad that people were rioting on Wall Street. Sound familiar? One thing I've learned during my 95 years is that history repeats itself. Also I've learned how to leverage my skills to take advantage of new opportunities That worked for me in the credit-card industry and in offshore oil production. Most recently, I leveraged all that into a career as a business-book author. Here are my Top 5 lessons for navigating dire business straits:

  • McRib is gone. Seven variations you can make at home.

    McRib is gone. Seven variations you can make at home.

    To the dismay of its many fans, the McRib is disappearing from the McDonald's menu. After Nov. 14, McDonald's will no longer offer the pork sandwich nationwide (although some restaurants carry it periodically). Can’t wait for the McRib to come back? Take heart. McDonald’s’ elusuive sandwich is pretty easy to replicate at home. And while you’re at it, why not get creative? Here are our Top 7 homemade McRib sandwiches. All are kitchen-tested, although most of these are more fun to talk about than to eat. Have any brilliant McRib creations of your own? Tell us about it!

  • The evolution of sexual harassment awareness

    The evolution of sexual harassment awareness

    Sexual harassment ranges from annoying to illegal. There was a time when it was "accepted" as a form of hazing, the price of being a woman in the workplace. Teasing, groping, and worse were often tolerated, as was employee termination if a woman didn’t provide sexual favors to her harasser. That began to change as women sought redress through the courts in the 1970s and '80s. A growing body of legal precedents and the passage of laws strengthening the Civil Rights Act have made the threat of a sexual harassment lawsuit a serious financial risk for companies today. Here's a look at some of the legal moves and high-profile cases that have raised awareness of this issue.

  • No spare tire in your new car? Four things you need to know.

    No spare tire in your new car? Four things you need to know.

    You're cruising along in your new car, when bang, there's a flat tire. You do everything you’re supposed to do: Safely maneuver to the side of the road, turn on your hazard lights, lift the hood to indicate car trouble, and open the trunk to get the spare. And it’s not there! In an effort to decrease vehicle weight, increase fuel economy, and allow for more trunk space, manufacturers have been replacing full-size spare tires with smaller, temporary ones. Now, even these are disappearing in some models in favor of a tire repair kit the size of a shoebox. Don’t have a spare tire in your trunk? Here are four things you need to know: 

  • Veterans Day: America's wartime vets, by the numbers

    Veterans Day: America's wartime vets, by the numbers

    Veterans Day (US) and Remembrance Day (British Commonwealth) are observed on Nov. 11, the day in 1918 that an armistice ended hostilities in The Great War. Some 41 million Americans have served in the US military since 1775; 23 million of them are still alive, of whom 17 million served during a conflict. Source: 2010 American Community Survey, Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs

  • What is a short sale? Five things you need to know.

    What is a short sale? Five things you need to know.

    Is a foreclosure staring you in the face? For many Americans faced with foreclosure and, possibly, bankruptcy, a better option is often a short sale. Short sales, which are up 10 percent from the same period last year, according to RealtyTrac, are becoming an increasingly popular way to deal with homes and homeowners burdened with too much debt. However, many homeowners still aren’t clear what a short sale is and whether it is the best solution for them. Here are five things you need to know about short sales: 

  • What the Keystone XL pipeline would mean for the US

    What the Keystone XL pipeline would mean for the US

    The Obama administration announced on Thursday it was delaying construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline, a proposed Canadian project so rich in promised jobs, tax revenues, and oil imports that its approval seemed assure. But the proposal to bring crude oil from Alberta’s tar sands to refineries in Texas involved a pipeline traversing America’s heartland, including an environmentally sensitive region atop the vital Ogallala aquifer. Delaying the project to examine an alternative route around the aquifer appears the safest political move for the moment, though it won’t give President Obama immunity from criticism. Here is some background on the pipeline project.

  • 2 of the best novels of 2011

    2 of the best novels of 2011

    Second-guessing awards is as old as competition. Shortly after the first Greek athlete had a crown of laurel placed on his brow at the first Olympics, there no doubt were murmurings in the stands that “Agathon was robbed.” While Julian Barnes finally took home the Man Booker Prize this month after four nominations, the lineup of finalists thoroughly puzzled – if not infuriated – many. No Hollinghurst? No Ondaatje? Well, after reading five of the six nominees, I can safely say, “No Hollinghurst? No Ondaatje?” Both Booker winners have new novels out this October, both are without question among the finest work they’ve done, and both easily trump finalists Stephen Kelman’s “Pigeon English” and A.D. Miller’s “Snowdrops” (sorry, guys). And I’m not just grading on a snob’s curve. Both “The Cat’s Table” and “The Stranger’s Child” win in terms of that dirty word the judges cited that so enraged pretentious folks: “readability.”

  • 10 magnificent "places to see before you die"

    10 magnificent "places to see before you die"

    Wondering where to go on your next vacation – or just want to read about breathtaking sights from all over the globe? The updated edition of "1,000 Places To See Before You Die" spans the globe to compile a list of inspired destinations for the diehard traveler.

  • Europe debt crisis: 3 reasons why China won't help out

    Europe debt crisis: 3 reasons why China won't help out

    Although China, the world's largest creditor, has bought European bonds in the past, experts doubts that it will reach out to help alleviate the Europe debt crisis. There are reasons why it would, and here are three main reasons why it won't:

  • Eurozone crisis: 3 reasons why China might help bail out Europe

    Eurozone crisis: 3 reasons why China might help bail out Europe

    China is the world’s biggest creditor, with foreign exchange reserves of around $3.2 trillion. Europe would like Beijing to use some of that money to lend a hand and help bail out the eurozone. China has stressed it will not be a savior to Europe, and there are a reasons it won't. However, there are a few reasons China could change course and come to the rescue. Here are three:

  • In quotes: 7 Berlusconi memorable moments

    In quotes: 7 Berlusconi memorable moments

    One Italian media sport is to capture outgoing Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi’s often rambling and controversial foot-in-mouth moments. Reuters and the BBC have also joined in with translations. Here are seven from the past decade:

  • The 50-plus votes and allegations that failed to sink Berlusconi

    The 50-plus votes and allegations that failed to sink Berlusconi

    Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi has survived more than 50 no-confidence votes in his political career, surviving yet another at least implicit one on Tuesday. But he is still headed out the door, he says. Over the years, charges of corruption, accusations of soliciting underage prostitutes, and alleged involvement with the mafia were not enough to sink the indomitable Mr. Berlusconi – but charges of mishandling the economic crisis seem to have done it. Here’s a look at the many things that would have taken down many other world leaders.

 
 
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