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  • Five big moments in New Hampshire primary history

    The Granite State's first-in-the nation primary has been a launching pad for many a presidential hopeful – but not always. The following are among the most interesting outcomes.Sources: Political Research Quarterly, NewHampshirePrimary.com, New Hampshire Almanac

  • Bestselling books the week of 1/5/12, according to IndieBound*

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • 6 moments that changed a life

    From the new book 'The Moment,' 6 examples of a moment that changed a life.

  • Thirty ideas from people under 30: The Politicians

    They are explorers and activists, artists and educators, farmers and faith leaders – even mayors. And they have trenchant suggestions on how to improve the world.

  • Thirty ideas from people under 30: The Artisans

    They are explorers and activists, artists and educators, farmers and faith leaders – even mayors. And they have trenchant suggestions on how to improve the world.

  • Six steps to choosing the best refrigerator

    If you’ve had the pleasure of purchasing an appliance within the last 10 years you’re probably aware that things are not as simple as they once used to be. While technology has made many things in our lives easier, choosing the best refrigerator among hundreds of similar models isn’t one of them. Family size and lifestyle are only a few of the factors that influence a purchase. That said, armed with the right information and knowing what questions to ask can ease the process of finding the best refrigerator: 

  • 10 memories from the book that inspired 'Downton Abbey'

    "Below Stairs," the memoir that inspired "Downton Abbey" and "Upstairs, Downstairs," gets a re-release as "Downton Abbey" begins its second season.

  • Five reasons the world won't end in 2012

    Pointing to the end of the Mayan Long Count calendar on Dec. 21, 2012, many doomsday believers think that life as we know it on Earth has entered it's final year. NASA begs to differ. 

  • 10 best books of January, according to Amazon's editors

    The 10 best books of January, 2012, according to Amazon's editors.

  • Quadrantid meteors and 11 other big skywatching events of 2012

    What lies ahead sky-wise for 2012? Joe Rao, SPACE.com Skywatching Columnist, selected what he considers to be the top 12 "skylights" for this coming year,

  • Technology 2012: Four tech trends to watch

    Technological innovations lay at the heart of many of last year's biggest stories -- from citizen-recorded videos that fanned the flames of the Arab Spring to the social-media organized Occupy movement. So what new technologies – and unexpected uses of them – will change social habits and relationships this year? Here are four 2012 technology trends that are sure to play a role: 

  • 10 novels to watch for in 2012

    Here are 10 must-read novels coming at you in early 2012.

  • Correspondent reflections: The 10 news events that shaped 2011

    Correspondent reflections: The 10 news events that shaped 2011

    In this special section, we look at the year’s biggest stories, and seven staff correspondents reflect on events in hot spots from Latin America to the Libyan front. 

  • 7 of the best young adult novels of 2011

    7 of the best young adult novels of 2011

    Young adult fiction, as we have heard and heard and heard, has become the fastest-growing segment of the publishing industry, roping in readers of all ages. The books on this list are not necessarily the bestselling books of the year. They are simply good books. Most, at base, are simply highly satisfying realistic novels that describes the world as seen through the eyes of persons who happen to be somewhere between the ages of 12 and 18. – By Amy Benfer, for The Barnes & Noble Review

  • Seven women who shaped the world in 2011

    Seven women who shaped the world in 2011

    Women played some significant roles this past year, from making peace to crafting economic policy in the midst of a crisis. Here are seven who shaped 2011:

  • New Year’s Eve: five ways to ring in 2012

    New Year’s Eve: five ways to ring in 2012

    New Year’s Eve festivities are already under way in some parts of the world. Here’s a sampling of fun ways people can celebrate the dawn of 2012 – in the United States and beyond.

  • Election 101: How an Iowa GOP caucus works

    Election 101: How an Iowa GOP caucus works

    Contrary to popular belief, the Iowa caucuses are not a part of the state populated by Georgians, Armenians, and Azerbaijanis. Sorry, bad pun. (See Caucasus, a region of Eurasia.) But there is some confusion about what the Iowa caucuses are, exactly. So in a few easy steps, let us explain what will happen in the Hawkeye State the evening of Jan. 3 – the first presidential nominating contest of the season.

  • Six predictions for consumers in 2012

    Six predictions for consumers in 2012

    It’s been nice, 2011, but as we move into the new year, many consumers are no doubt wondering what 2012 has in store for them, particularly when it comes to their wallets. Is a double-dip recession in the cards? Will it be easier to get a mortgage? Is a checking account switch in order? What will interest rates be like in the new year? Here are my Top 6 predictions for consumers in 2012:

  • 20 non-fiction books to watch for in 2012

    20 non-fiction books to watch for in 2012

    Oh, the promise of a new year! So many fresh starts and remarkable discoveries lie ahead – including the many that will be made between the pages of a book. For those eager for a preview, here’s a sampling of some of the more promising of the early 2012 titles.

  • North Korea not the only offender: 6 official photo fudgings

    North Korea not the only offender: 6 official photo fudgings

    As state manipulators of the media go, few can compare to North Korea, which this week is mourning the death of Kim Jong-il.  But even with all the careful orchestration of the ceremonies, the North Korean media still found it necessary to doctor an official photograph of the funeral procession.  Just as governments are finding it easier to use technology to manipulate images, so too is the public finding it easier to spot such digital trickery. Here are six noteworthy attempts by governments to shape media coverage through image manipulation.

  • A year of oops: five big political gaffes of 2011

    A year of oops: five big political gaffes of 2011

    There’s nothing like a presidential campaign cycle to bring out big political gaffes – at times injecting doubt about candidates, but also offering some much-needed comic relief and glimpses of humanity. 2011 had some doozies, and some of the most memorable actually weren’t on the campaign trail. GOP presidential candidate Michele Bachmann, who said the “shot heard round the world” was fired in New Hampshire (correct answer: Massachusetts), nailed the politicians’ dilemma perfectly: "People can make mistakes, and I wish I could be perfect every time I say something, but I can't." Here are five of the biggest political “uh-ohs” of 2011:

  • Defying Putin: 7 Russians to watch

    Defying Putin: 7 Russians to watch

    Vladimir Putin's "managed democracy" offers few opportunities for new leaders to emerge, build their own independent political base, and legitimately vie for power. That closed and controlled system is now teetering after tens of thousands of Russians marched in the streets of Russian cities in December to reject Mr. Putin's penchant for bureaucratic manipulation, media control, and vote-rigging. Fresh leaders are emerging without the Kremlin's approval and finding their voices. The following are seven to watch in coming months. 

  • Getting the Strait of Hormuz straight: an FAQ

    Getting the Strait of Hormuz straight: an FAQ

    Iran has caused a stir with its threat this week to close down the Strait of Hormuz if sanctions were imposed on Iranian oil exports. Here’s why this small body of water generates so much world attention.

  • Who's who in Iraq after the US exit?

    Who's who in Iraq after the US exit?

    The US troop surge in 2007 helped quiet Iraq's bloody civil war. But it failed to deliver on what US officials and officers said was crucial for Iraq's future at the time: sectarian reconciliation. Rather than forging a new national identity out of the horrors of Iraq's war, Iraq's Shiite and Sunni Arabs and ethnic Kurds sullenly retreated to their own sectarian corners, and the country's political parties remain vehicles for ethnic or sectarian interests. The next year is probably going to be the most crucial for determining the future of Iraq since the US-led invasion of 2003, as Iraq's various political factions compete for power and influence without foreign troops getting in the way. Here are a few of the major players.

  • Just how isolated is North Korea? 6 facts to consider

    Just how isolated is North Korea? 6 facts to consider

    North Korea's outlook has earned it the title of the 'hermit kingdom.' The country is both cut off from the wider world and intensely focused on its neighbors.

 
 
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