Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


Final Four: Is Obama the best celebrity bracketologist?

President Obama is still in with a shout at being the celebrity with the most accurate Final Four bracket, according to ESPN. But things are stacked against him this weekend.

(Page 2 of 2)



What's Lachey's secret? Well, hailing from Cincinnati may have helped – he picked Xavier and Cincinnati to win tough first-round matchups but had too little confidence in the Musketeers or the Bearcats, who survived a round longer than Lachey foretold. Lachey has a shot at getting half of the championship matchup correct -- he thinks Kentucky will win it all, but he though they'd play now-eliminated Syracuse.

Skip to next paragraph

When sorted purely by percentage of games picked correctly, however, golfer Jim Furyk sits atop the charts with 99.6 percent. He's trailed closely by fellow savants Patrick Sharp of the NHL's Chicago Blackhawks and Jesse Williams, an actor on TV hit Grey's Anatomy.

Who could make the biggest moves over the weekend from our celebrity bunch? The two contestants with the most points remaining are sixth-ranked Rajon Rondo, point guard for the Boston Celtics, who is riding alma mater Kentucky all the way to the championship, and the top female in the pool, soccer star Alex Morgan. If things shake out right for those two (Morgan also picked Kentucky), Morgan would take home the crown by picking more early-round games correctly than Rondo.

Morgan, with a bracket better than 56.7 percent of all entries, can know she busted hardwood luminaries including Miami Heat megastar LeBron James (53.4 percent) while crushing legendary college basketball announcer Dick Vitale and Los Angeles Lakers Center Pau Gasol (who beat only 14.3 percent of other brackets).

If you're hoping Obama will reign supreme come the end of the tourney, root for anybody but Kentucky. If you're Team Lachey or Team Morgan, pull on your Wildcats gear, strap up your unibrow mask and get ready for a wild Saturday night.

RELATED: Are you a real March Madness fan? Take the quiz.

Get daily or weekly updates from CSMonitor.com delivered to your inbox. Sign up today.

Permissions

Read Comments

View reader comments | Comment on this story

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer

 

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Danny Bent poses at the starting line of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass.

After the Boston Marathon bombings, Danny Bent took on a cross-country challenge

The athlete-adventurer co-founded a relay run called One Run for Boston that started in Los Angeles and ended at the marathon finish line to raise funds for victims.

 
 
Become a fan! Follow us! Google+ YouTube See our feeds!