Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


Johnny Manziel, a freshman, snags the Heisman

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel made football history Saturday night by winning the Heisman Trophy, a feat never before accomplished by a freshman. 

By Ralph D. RussoAP College Football Writer / December 9, 2012

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel gestures as he talks to reporters after becoming the first freshman to win the Heisman Trophy, college football's top individual prize, Saturday.

Henny Ray Abrams/AP

Enlarge

New York

He's Johnny Best in Football now — and a freshman, at that.

Skip to next paragraph

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel became the first newcomer to win the Heisman Trophy, taking college football's top individual prize Saturday night after a record-breaking debut.

Notre Dame linebacker Manti Te'o finished a distant second in the voting and Kansas State quarterback Collin Klein was third. In a Heisman race with two nontraditional candidates, Manziel broke through the class ceiling and kept Te'o from becoming the first purely defensive player to win the award.

"That barrier's broken now," Manziel said. "It's starting to become more of a trend that freshmen are coming in early and that they are ready to play. And they are really just taking the world by storm."

None more than the guy they call Johnny Football.

Manziel drew 474 first-place votes and 2,029 points from the panel of media members and former winners. Te'o had 321 first-place votes and 1,706 points and Klein received 60 firsts and 894 points.

"I have been dreaming about this since I was a kid, running around the backyard pretending I was Doug Flutie, throwing Hail Marys to my dad," he said after hugging his parents and kid sister.

Flutie was one of many Heisman winners standing behind Manziel as he gave his speech on stage at the Best Buy Theater in Times Square.

"I always wanted to be in a fraternity," Manziel said later. "Now I get to be in the most prestigious one in the entire world."

Manziel was so nervous waiting for the winner to be announced, he wondered if the television cameras could see his heart pounding beneath his navy blue pinstripe suit. But he seemed incredibly calm after, hardly resembling the guy who dashes around the football field on Saturday. He simply bowed his head, and later gave the trophy a quick kiss.

"It's such an honor to represent Texas A&M, and my teammates here tonight. I wish they could be on the stage with me," he said with a wide smile, concluding his speech like any good Aggie: "Gig' em."

Just a few days after turning 20, Manziel proved times have truly changed in college football, and that experience can be really overrated.

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer