Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


Andy Roddick makes US Open his swan song

Andy Roddick says he'll retire after the US Open. Roddick is the last American man to get a Grand Slam victory, the US Open in 2003. Roddick played in four Grand Slam finals, losing to Roger Federer in each.

(Page 2 of 3)



"It's been an incredible journey," Clijsters said, "and a lot of dreams for me have come true because of tennis."

Skip to next paragraph

Venus Williams came within two points of winning Thursday, but dropped five of the last six games and ended up exiting early at a tournament she's won twice, beaten 6-2, 5-7, 7-5 by sixth-seeded Angelique Kerber of Germany in a nearly 3-hour match.

Asked after the match if she's ready to join Andy Roddick in retirement, Williams replied: "No, because if I could have made two more shots, I probably could have won that match. There's a big difference for me because I'm beating myself. I'm not getting destroyed out there. ... If I was out there and people were killing me, maybe it's time to hang it up."

Before Tsonga's loss, top-five seeds on the men's and women's sides had played 14 matches — and won all 14 in straight sets.

Tsonga was the runner-up at the 2008 Australian Open and a semifinalist at Wimbledon this year. He had reached at least the third round in 18 straight Grand Slam trips.

"Today I was not in a good shape," he said. "I didn't play good tennis. It seemed like I couldn't hit the ball enough hard to put my opponent out of position. I don't really know why it was like this today, but sometimes it's happen with me."

The 23-year-old Klizan, meanwhile, had failed to make it past the second round in three previous Grand Slam appearances. He had never defeated an opponent ranked better than No. 49.

"I had no pressure," Klizan said. "If I lose, then I lose. I lose with (a) good player. But I won and I'm very happy. It means for me more that I beat finally a guy from top 10."

This year's Open has generated plenty of drama in one area: comebacks from two sets down. American Mardy Fish rallied to beat Nikolay Davydenko 4-6, 6-7 (4), 6-2, 6-1, 6-2, the 10th time in this tournament a man has won after losing the first two sets — already an Open record.

The 30-year-old Fish, seeded 23rd, missed two months this season because of an accelerated heartbeat but showed few signs of fatigue in playing nearly 3 1/2 hours.

Davydenko had an interesting take on the match, suggesting men should only play best-of-three sets, rather than five.

"Why (do) girls play best of three sets and we should play best of five sets and have the same prize money?" Davydenko said, reviving a familiar debate.

"Why are we playing five-set matches? We need to play best of three in Grand Slams. Everybody will support (that idea, even Roger) Federer. For Federer, it's easy to win in one hour, two sets. No need to run (for) a third set," Davydenko said.

Tomas Berdych, the sixth seed, had a similarly easy time to Federer, beating Jurgen Zopp of Estonia, 6-1, 6-4, 6-2.

Read Comments

View reader comments | Comment on this story

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer

 

Editors' picks