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White House solar panels to provide Obamas green power

White House solar panels: The solar panels are to be installed by spring 2011, and will heat water for the first family and supply some electricity.

By Dina CappielloAssociated Press / October 5, 2010

The first set of solar panels to adorn Jimmy Carter's White House is seen in 1979. The Obama White House will announce on Oct. 5, that the most famous residence in America plans to install solar panels for the first time atop the White House's living quarters.

Harvey Georges/AP

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WASHINGTON

Solar power is coming to President Barack Obama's house.

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The most famous residence in America, which has already boosted its green credentials by planting a garden, plans to install solar panels atop the White House's living quarters. The solar panels are to be installed by spring 2011, and will heat water for the first family and supply some electricity.

The plans will be formally announced later Tuesday by White House Council on Environmental Quality Chairwoman Nancy Sutley and Energy Secretary Steven Chu.

Former Presidents Jimmy Carter and George W. Bush both tapped the sun during their days in the White House. Carter in the late 1970s spent $30,000 on a solar water-heating system for West Wing offices. Bush's solar systems powered a maintenance building and some of the mansion, and heated water for the pool.

IN PICTURES: Inside President Obama's White House

Obama, who has championed renewable energy, has been under increasing pressure to lead by example by installing solar at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, something White House officials said has been under consideration since he first took office.

The decision perhaps has more import now after legislation to reduce global warming pollution died in the Senate, despite the White House's support. Obama has vowed to try again on a smaller scale.

Last month, global warming activists with 350.org carried one of Carter's solar panels — which were removed in 1986 — from Unity College in Maine to Washington to urge Obama to put solar panels on his roof. It was part of a global campaign to persuade world leaders to install solar on their homes. After a meeting with White House officials, they left Washington without a commitment.

That campaign followed calls by the solar industry for the White House to become a national billboard for solar power.

"Putting solar on the roof of the nation's most important real estate is a powerful symbol calling on all Americans to rethink how we generate electricity," Solar Energy Industries Association President Rhone Resch said.

IN PICTURES: Inside President Obama's White House