Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


Energy Voices: Insights on the future of fuel and power

Where do you stand on fracking?

Few topics in the energy sector generate more debate than the relative merits and demerits of fracking, Stuebi writes. 

By Richard T. StuebiGuest blogger / March 29, 2013

A drilling rig is set up near a barn in Springville, Pa., to tap gas from the giant Marcellus Shale gas field. It’s up to us as engaged citizens to ensure that the powers-that-be fully hold accountable those who participate in fracking activities, Stuebi writes.

Alex Brandon/AP/File

Enlarge

In the energy sector, there are few topics that generate more debate today than the relative merits/demerits of fracking.  To see just how strongly-held yet evenly-divided opinion is, check out this online debate moderated by The Economist and sponsored by Statoil (NYSE: STO).

Skip to next paragraph

A premier site for commentary on clean tech, energy, and the green economy, Cleantech Blog is edited by longtime clean-tech industry investor and executive Neal Dikeman of Jane Capital Partners LLC, and venture capitalist and industry analyst Richard Stuebi. For more clean-tech news and analysis, click here.

Recent posts

The question is framed simply:  “Do the benefits derived from shale gas outweigh the drawbacks of fracking?”  Writing in defense of the “pro” position was Amy Myers Jaffe, the Executive Director for Energy and Sustainability at the Graduate School of Management at the University of California Davis.  Writing in opposition was Michael Brune, the Executive Director of the Sierra Club.

The final tally of the debate:  51% voted “No”, while 49% voted “Yes”.

Honestly, I lean more towards the “Yes” side of the ledger.  While fracking raises significant concerns, I believe that they can be managed — though it’s up to us as engaged citizens to ensure that the powers-that-be fully hold accountable those who participate in fracking activities to the highest standards. 

My hunch is that the beliefs and the numbers of the “No” side have been strongly influenced by films such as “Gasland” and the more-recent “Promised Land”.  I confess that I haven’t seen either of them, and while I suspect that they have oversimplified complex issues and stretched the facts/truth to fit a convenient dramatic storyline (as so many movies do), it really is unfair for me to criticize them.  Even so, it’s clear that — other than the ever-dependable defender of all-things fossil fuels, Fox News — there are few “pro”-fracking vehicles in mass-culture appealing to the middle-ground to provide a counterbalancing force from the seemingly-dominant message that fracking is dangerous and bad.

As a friend of mine likes to say about thorny political dilemmas:  “I have friends on both sides of this issue, and on this issue, I’m with my friends.”  With respect to fracking, this applies.

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best energy bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger's own site by clicking on the link in the blog description box above.

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer

 

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Danny Bent poses at the starting line of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass.

After the Boston Marathon bombings, Danny Bent took on a cross-country challenge

The athlete-adventurer co-founded a relay run called One Run for Boston that started in Los Angeles and ended at the marathon finish line to raise funds for victims.

 
 
Become a fan! Follow us! Google+ YouTube See our feeds!