Business The Circle Bastiat

  • Are central banks really necessary?

    Some analyst argue that a central banking system is only necessary when an economy operates with paper money. Others think that isn't always the case. 

  • For shame: Who is really to blame in USOC uniforms spat?

    In the face of political pressure regarding the use of Chinese manufacturers for Olympic uniforms, the USOC capitulated. But perhaps the more important question is, why is it so much more expensive to manufacture clothing domestically.

  • Sorens on Raico: Great minds think (mostly) alike

    A review of Ralph Raico’s outstanding recent book, Classical Liberalism and the Austrian School reminds David Gordon that appeals to “the results of human action but not of human design” are quite common among Austrian methodological individualists.

  • Debate on reserve fractional banking devolves into public squabble

    Ron Paul showed how he is open to debate by having both Professor Joseph Salerno and Professor Larry White testify before his sub-committee on the subject of fractional reserve banking. But a perceived bias towards Salerno prompted a rebuke by George Selgin.

November 25, 2014

Photos of the day 11/25

Sajal Biswas, a snake charmer, puts the head of a snake into his mouth as he performs on a roadside on the outskirts of Agartala, capital of India's northeastern state of Tripura. He earns around 400 to 500 rupees ($6.45 to $8.07) per day.

More The Circle Bastiat
  • Debate on reserve fractional banking devolves into public squabble

    Ron Paul showed how he is open to debate by having both Professor Joseph Salerno and Professor Larry White testify before his sub-committee on the subject of fractional reserve banking. But a perceived bias towards Salerno prompted a rebuke by George Selgin.

  • European interest rates cut. Too little, too late?

    European interest rates were cut by central banks in an effort to rescue the eurozone economy. But is the cut in European interest rates a last ditch effort?

  • Liberty for all: Will the real 'Mr. Republican' please stand up?

    Liberty and progress go hand in hand, according to The Circle Bastiat's John P. Cochran. President Taft was once known as Mr. Republican. In the present era, Cochran believes Ron Paul has taken up Taft's mantle.

  • The Federal Reserve's new and improved transparency

    The Fed met today to discuss possible further reforms. But how will the new kinder, gentler and allegedly more transparent Fed communicate to the public this momentous decision?

  • He's a fan: One man's defense of Ron Paul

    A staunch libertarian, presidential candidate Ron Paul has always had interesting ideas about how best to run the American economy. From Austrian economics to the gold standard and free market money, a new book outlines and defends Paul's plans.

  • Can you yell 'run' in a crowded bank?

    Many states have laws on the books prohibiting anyone from making disparaging comments about a particular bank’s financial condition. This talk is thought to be outside free speech because rumors can trigger a bank run, but a recent ruling has some banks worried.

  • The euro exodus from Greece and Spain

    Wary depositors are hauling billions of euros our of Greek and Spanish banks, reflecting the nervous mood of the people.

  • Huge mortgage debts keep the housing market tumbling

    Experts have been calling for the bottom of the housing market each year since the crash, and prices continue to tumble. Why? In an overwhelming number of cases, homeowners owe more on their mortgages than their houses are actually worth.

  • Herbert Hoover's bad rap

    Though Roosevelt gets credit for saving the nation, Hoover was far from a 'do-nothing president.'

  • Is tanning over-regulated?

    The recent 'tanning mom' controversy has state and local governments cracking down on tanning bed use. Is that fair?

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