All Books

  • Mark Twain: 10 reasons we love him

    Mark Twain: 10 reasons we love him

    It's the 176th birthday of one of the most iconic of figures in US history. In honor of the day that Samuel Clemens was born, here are 10 reasons why we love the great American author known as Mark Twain.

  • Mark Twain quotes: 10 favorites on his birthday

    Mark Twain quotes: 10 favorites on his birthday

    William Faulkner called him “…the first truly American writer.” Ernest Hemingway declared that all American writing comes from “Huckleberry Finn,” and “there has been nothing as good since." And Norman Mailer said “Huck Finn” stands up “page for page” to the “best modern American novels.” Wednesday marks the 176th anniversary of the birth of the matchless Samuel Clemens, who wrote under the pen name Mark Twain. His genius lay in his distinctive ability to convey profound wisdom and profane wit in the same breath. Here, in tribute to the man Faulkner called the “father of American literature,” are 10 quotes from Mark Twain.

  • 4 excellent adventure books for young readers

    4 excellent adventure books for young readers

    With its whopping 2.5 million-copy print run, “Inheritance” is very likely the fantasy book in which your favorite teen has his or her nose buried this month. The fourth and final installment of Christopher Paolini’s books about Eragon, the orphaned farm boy-turned-dragon rider, offers all the action and answers its fans have waited eight years for. But “Inheritance” is also darker than its predecessors, and its graphic violence includes the prolonged torture of a young woman. Knopf recommends it for ages “12 and up,” and I wouldn’t hand it to anybody younger. For those seeking alternatives, this fall offers four excellent adventure tales for young readers. There are museums, pirates, gods, rodents, runaways, and lots and lots salt water.

  • 5 great books about friendship for tween readers

    5 great books about friendship for tween readers

    A Scrabble match. A new school. Pie recipes. A lost coat. The ballet. For young teens and preteens, life is generally eventful. But nothing matters as much as relationships. With the right friends, everything seems possible. And without them, well – no one wants to go there. This fall’s crop of books aimed at readers from age 8 into the early teens offers an absorbing range of adventures – but none greater than the adventure of finding a true friend.

  • Emily Dickinson birthday bash in Tucson

    Chapter & Verse Emily Dickinson birthday bash in Tucson

    "The Big Read" events include poetry readings, a dance show, and recipes, all inspired by the work of Emily Dickinson.

  • Former Polish first lady Danuta Walesa felt isolated, left to raise children alone

    Chapter & Verse Former Polish first lady Danuta Walesa felt isolated, left to raise children alone

    Walesa says in her new memoir that husband Lech Walesa is "difficult to get to know" and that during his political ascendancy, she was "a mother, a teacher, a cook, a cleaning lady, a nurse."

  • Denise Mina: how the literary female detective has changed

    Chapter & Verse Denise Mina: how the literary female detective has changed

    Alex Morrow, the female cop at the center of Denise Mina's series, is proof that the literary depiction of woman in police work has come a long way.

  • Finding Fernanda

    Finding Fernanda

    Two mothers – one in the US, one in Guatemala – seek the same child in this exposé of the abuses of the international adoption system.

  • The Dovekeepers

    The Dovekeepers

    Alice Hoffman offers a feminist take on the siege of Masada in what may be her best novel yet.

  • Jeffrey Eugenides talks about 'The Marriage Plot' and pokes fun at literary theorists

    Chapter & Verse Jeffrey Eugenides talks about 'The Marriage Plot' and pokes fun at literary theorists

    Jeffrey Eugenides talks about his novels – and themes of death, suicide, and Detroit.

  • Michele Bachmann shares her life story with voters in 'Core of Conviction'

    Chapter & Verse Michele Bachmann shares her life story with voters in 'Core of Conviction'

    Michele Bachmann's campaign autobiography tells of a youthful world view shaped by an antipathy to Jimmy Carter and a reverence for Ronald Regan.

  • Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman

    Catherine the Great: Portrait of a Woman

    Biographer Robert K. Massie gives us a Catherine the Great who is ever interesting and intelligent – but not necessarily admirable.

  • Reader recommendation: Aftermath

    Reader recommendation: Aftermath

    Monitor readers share their favorite book picks.

  • Why Penguin is worried about the role of Amazon's Kindle in libraries

    Chapter & Verse Why Penguin is worried about the role of Amazon's Kindle in libraries

    Penguin Group – citing security problems – has put a hold on the distribution of new e-books to libraries.

  • 5 stories about Regis Philbin

    5 stories about Regis Philbin

    After a long career, Regis Philbin is saying goodbye to his morning show. In his new book "How I Got This Way" he writes about some of his many show biz memories. Here are five of the anecdotes the talk show host shares.

  • 6 of history's forgotten stories

    6 of history's forgotten stories

    Ever hear of the man who shot John Wilkes Booth or the "other Anne Frank" family? From Graeme Donald's "The Man Who Shot The Man Who Shot Lincoln," here are six stories that history forgot.

  • 11/22/63

    11/22/63

    Stephen King whisks readers back to 1963 in a piece of time-traveling historical fiction that asks: What if JFK had survived?

  • Reader recommendation: The First Tycoon

    Reader recommendation: The First Tycoon

    Monitor readers share their favorite book picks.

  • Walt Disney's Donald Duck: "Lost in the Andes" (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library)

    Walt Disney's Donald Duck: "Lost in the Andes" (The Complete Carl Barks Disney Library)

    The genius of Carl Barks is collected for a fresh generation of fans, in a new series by Fantagraphics Books.

  • 6 novels that re-imagine history

    6 novels that re-imagine history

    You've heard of the butterfly effect: If one small event is different, all of history is changed forever. And it's a game people have loved to play for decades. What if the South had won the Civil War? What if Hitler had won World War II? What if Europe hadn't lasted beyond the Black Plague? Stephen King's new novel "11/22/63" imagines what would have happened if President Kennedy had lived beyond 1963, but he's not the first to rearrange history. Here's six novels that explore a slightly alternate version of very familiar events.