All list articles

  • Europa or bust? Maybe not. Top 9 priorities for planetary research missions

    Europa or bust? Maybe not. Top 9 priorities for planetary research missions

    The National Research Council has just unveiled planetary scientists' space-mission wish-list for the next 10 years. Tight federal budgets will provide the reality check. Here's a sampler of missions the panel recommends NASA undertake this decade.

  • National debt ceiling 101: Is a crisis looming?

    National debt ceiling 101: Is a crisis looming?

    In a year of high drama over federal budgets, the nation’s so-called national debt ceiling is becoming a prominent part of the political debate. The Treasury is close to hitting this borrowing limit, yet many in Congress say the ceiling shouldn’t be raised without new commitments to put America on a path of fiscal prudence. Here’s a guide to how the ceiling works and what’s at stake for the economy.

  • International Women's Day: What's it all about?

    International Women's Day: What's it all about?

    Today is the 100th anniversary of International Women’s Day. In 1911 – the year the holiday was first celebrated internationally – women could not yet vote in most countries. Now, a number of women serve as presidents and in other positions of power. But there’s still more to do if women are to enjoy the same access and rights as men, say International Women’s Day organizers and the UN. This year’s focus? "Equal access to education, training, and science and technology: Pathway to decent work for women.” Read on to find out more about International Women’s Day.

  • Fat Tuesday 2011: Top cities that celebrate Mardi Gras

    Fat Tuesday 2011: Top cities that celebrate Mardi Gras

    Partying has begun today in major cities to mark Mardi Gras, or Fat Tuesday, a last gastronomical hurrah before the Christian fasts that start on Ash Wednesday and continue during the season of Lent. The festivities that precede Fat Tuesday are known as Carnival in Catholic European nations, Latin America, and Canada. They are known as Shrovetide in the United Kingdom and Ireland, and Mardi Gras in the US and Australia. The Mardi Gras season starts on twelfth night (January 5) and ends on Fat Tuesday, but the festivities and parade season usually last for only the few days nearest Fat Tuesday. Fat Tuesday 2011 falls on March 8, but the day falls on a different date every year depending on when Easter falls. This year Fat Tuesday is being celebrated later than any other Fat Tuesday in over 150 years. The festivities include rich, fatty foods, masks and elaborate costumes, balls, and large scale parades at which participants throw small gifts. In the early days of the Mardi Gras parades, participants would throw candy or nuts. The "throws" have since evolved to include whistles, trinkets, cups, fake money (called doubloons), beaded necklaces, oranges, and even coconuts.

  • 10 ways to prevent cyberconflict

    10 ways to prevent cyberconflict

    From establishing cyberwar limitation treaties to banning the 'first use' of cyberweapons, experts offer ways to head off a future major conflict in cyberspace.

  • Britain's SAS in Libya: What happened there?

    Britain's SAS in Libya: What happened there?

    The confusion surrounding the detention and then release of several British nationals – including members of the Special Air Service – in Libya has generated as much interest as the incident itself. However, little information is available on why a group of British men arrived unauthorized and unannounced in Libya. Below is an overview of what can be confirmed about the incident.

  • People-powered democratic revolts - do they last?

    People-powered democratic revolts - do they last?

    Analyzing a selection of political revolutions - successful and not - around the globe since World War II

  • McLobster rumor? Nah! McDonalds should add these five items.

    McLobster rumor? Nah! McDonalds should add these five items.

    McLobster rumor: The sandwich, which appears seasonally at some New England and eastern Canadian McDonalds, was supposed to go nationwide. The chain has tweeted that the rumors are false. But that's all right, there are more McDelicacies to be made. Here are the Top 5 items that we'd like to see added to the McDonalds menu.

  • From Libya's Qaddafi to Sudan's Bashir: Key International Criminal Court inquiries

    From Libya's Qaddafi to Sudan's Bashir: Key International Criminal Court inquiries

    The International Criminal Court today announced it would investigate Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi and several members of his inner circle for crimes against humanity in Libya’s ongoing uprising. It is the second-ever ICC investigation into a sitting head of state, and one of only a handful of inquiries into crimes committed by world leaders. Below, a look at ICC cases:

  • Gas prices out of control? Seven ways lawmakers could help – or hurt.

    Gas prices out of control? Seven ways lawmakers could help – or hurt.

    Gas prices are approaching $4 a gallon and oil prices are above $100 a barrel, leading politicians in Washington and statehouses to propose a flurry of legislation. Some proposals strive to quell voter angst while others might balance budgets by raising gas prices. Meanwhile, wind, biofuel, nuclear, and oil industries are lobbying Congress to support more domestic energy production. Many of the proposals are longer-range and thus unlikely to affect short-term gas prices, energy economists say.

  • Bestselling books the week of 3/3/11, according to *IndieBound

    Bestselling books the week of 3/3/11, according to *IndieBound

    What's selling best in independent bookstores across America.

  • Libya uprising: 5 steps the world is taking

    Libya uprising: 5 steps the world is taking

    The international community is struggling to respond to the escalating Libya conflict. Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi has warned of “bloodshed” if other countries intervene, and the opposition rebels have yet to formally request military assistance. Here's what's been done so far.

  • Just promoted to manager? Here are 11 ways to shine.

    Just promoted to manager? Here are 11 ways to shine.

    “I’ve just been made a manager and I haven’t a clue what to do!” This was what went through my head more than 20 years ago when I found myself suddenly in charge. My focus should have been on what I could do to shine. Executives and managers shared similar stories of dread and insecurity when I was researching my book. But your bosses clearly saw something in you that caused them to promote you. Your job is to build on these strengths, while you try and master the other skills necessary to be a successful leader. Here are 11 ways you can shine from Day 1:

  • Can the US military help Libyan rebels oust Muammar Qaddafi? Four options.

    Can the US military help Libyan rebels oust Muammar Qaddafi? Four options.

    As violence in Libya increases, US officials have promised that the administration is exploring “all possible options for action” against Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi. Yet Pentagon officials emphasize that they are also weighing the adverse risks of US military action aiding rebels, such as the possibility that Mr. Qaddafi could galvanize support in the name of anti-imperialism. What are steps the US military could take to aid rebels, and how feasible are they?

  • Oil reaches $100 a barrel: Five winners, five losers

    Oil reaches $100 a barrel: Five winners, five losers

    With the price of energy soaring – oil passed $100 per barrel on Tuesday ­– long-haul truckers are hurting, but hybrid manufacturers are smiling. Californians feel the pinch at the pump while Midwesterners, closer to large fuel inventories, wonder what all the fuss is about. With gasoline now at $3.37 per gallon – 20 cents higher than last week, and rising daily – who is profiting from higher prices and who is not?

  • Libya uprising: Key cities

    Libya uprising: Key cities

    As Libya's antigovernment rebels take hold of more cities, the nation no longer appears divided between pro-government West vs. rebellious East. Now, with embattled leader Muammar Qaddafi facing dwindling support from traditional western strongholds, the situation increasingly appears to be Almost Everywhere vs. Tripoli. Here’s a look at some key cities. (Last updated March 1)

  • 3 short story collections: some of the best I've ever read

    3 short story collections: some of the best I've ever read

    When it comes to short stories, the best insight on how to read them I've ever found came from a new book on writing, “Unless It Moves the Human Heart,” by Roger Rosenblatt. One of Rosenblatt's graduate students said, in effect, that the writer begins by saying, “And so, we have come to this.” Of three new collections out this winter, two rank among the best I've ever read. If this is what we've come to, 2011 should be rich indeed.

  • Tax deductions for bingo? One of five strange IRS write-offs.

    Tax deductions for bingo? One of five strange IRS write-offs.

    Tax deductions ... er, income taxes are on Americans' minds as the April filing deadline approaches. Here are five of the more offbeat tax deductions the IRS allows you to include. Hey, maybe you even qualify!

  • How to draft a constitution

    How to draft a constitution

    Egypt’s military has suspended the country’s Constitution and tasked experts with overhauling its fundamental law. Other countries in the region may also soon be in line for such a make-over – redesigning government institutions, enshrining individual liberties, entrenching guarantees of democratic accountability. But not all constitutions are created equal. Here are a list of six big issues to consider when creating a Constitution from scratch:

  • Vote for the 5 best Dr. Seuss books

    Vote for the 5 best Dr. Seuss books

    Okay, let me be honest. There are no "5 best" Dr. Seuss books. Theodor Seuss Geisel published 44 children's books and each one is a marvel in its own way. However, I do have my own personal "5 best list," just as I'm sure that you have yours. Please help me to celebrate Dr. Seuss's birthday (he was born on March 2, 1904) by listing your own. In the meantime, here are mine.

  • The Oscars 2011: How real are the reality-based Best Picture nominees?

    The Oscars 2011: How real are the reality-based Best Picture nominees?

    Oscar has always loved films based on true stories – 100 out of 485 Best Picture nominees since 1927 would qualify – but never more than this year. Four of the 10 features on the Best Picture slate are based on real characters and events: “The King’s Speech,” “The Fighter,” “The Social Network,” and “127 Hours.” Eavesdrop on departing moviegoers and you will inevitably hear, “I’d love to know what really happened.” Here are some facts behind the “true-life” stories contending for this year’s Best Picture Academy Award.

  • Five Academy Awards surprises

    Five Academy Awards surprises

    The Oscar-winning Best Picture has not always been what people expected. Here are five films that defied the odds at the Academy Awards.

  • Oscar predictions 2011: Keep your eye on The King's Speech

    Oscar predictions 2011: Keep your eye on The King's Speech

    Oscar predictions 2011: The Monitor's film critic Peter Rainer picks which movies, and which actors, should win in five major Oscar categories. Best picture, best director, best actor, best actress, and best documentary. Do you agree?

  • How Mideast turmoil affects oil prices. Six questions answered

    How Mideast turmoil affects oil prices. Six questions answered

    From the first spark of Middle East unrest in Tunisia in December until the violent suppression of protests in Libya in late February, the price of a barrel of crude oil rose from $88 a barrel to more than $100. But rising demand – from oil-hungry China and other fast-growing nations – was pushing prices up even before the turmoil. How much prices rise depends largely on whether supplies flow unimpeded from the Middle East. Here’s a rundown on oil supply-price issues affecting the US.

  • George Harrison: 5 best books for his 68th birthday

    George Harrison: 5 best books for his 68th birthday

    The one they called the "quiet Beatle" was born on Feb. 25, 1943 – which would have made today his 68th birthday. If you've been missing the man ranked at No. 21 on Rolling Stone's list of the "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time," you can of course simply turn up the volume on "All Things Must Pass." Or you can pick up a book. I'd advise one of the five below.

 
 
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