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Terrorism & Security

How US special forces help in the hunt for Joseph Kony (+video)

Some 100 Special Forces soldiers are advising and training regional troops searching for Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, in central Africa.

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“Since 2008, the Pentagon and the State Department have been diligently working behind the scenes to provide military and intelligence support to the Ugandan military in the fight against the LRA, with the US embassy in Kampala coordinating the provision of money and technical assistance to the Ugandan military,” wrote Matthew Aid, author of Intel Wars: The Secret History of the Fight Against Terror.

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Though the effectiveness of the LRA has been diminished, it has successfully managed to avoid regional forces by moving through the jungles of the Central African Republic, South Sudan, and Congo. The Associated Press reports that since late last year, US forces have offered help largely in the form of technological and intelligence assistance. American forces are also trying to establish better communications the three countries to better coordinate efforts.

IN PICTURES: Kony and the Lord's Resistance ArmyMeanwhile, Ugandan officials have accused Sudan of harboring Kony. Col. Felix Kulayigye, Uganda’s Ministry of Defense spokesman, said that Kony and his LRA fighters look to Sudan for military supplies and then hide in the jungles of the Central African Republic where they can forage for food.

“He is in Bahr Gazel, a Khartoum-controlled area. We captured a rebel who was wearing a new uniform and said it was supplied by Khartoum, together with ammunition,” said Col. Kulayigye in an article by the Ugandan newspaper New Vision. “Since he had run out of ammunition and uniforms, he had to go back to his God-father [Omar Bashir, the president of Sudan], if I am to use those words.”

The LRA has been on the run since its camp in the Democratic Republic of Congo was bombed in 2008. Since then the group has splintered and is accused of butchering civilians and kidnapping local children to act as servants and sex slaves, reported The Christian Science Monitor earlier this month.

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