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British expenses scandal spurs celebrities to run for office

A 1980s pop star, a TV presenter, a former Beirut hostage, and a right-wing newspaper columnist are among the high-profile personalities emerging as potential challengers for seats held by discredited MPs.

By / May 31, 2009



LONDON – With trust in politicians at an all-time low amid a scandal about parliamentarians fiddling with expenses, Britain’s political establishment is facing yet another threat to its existence – celebrities.

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A 1980s pop star, a television presenter, a former Beirut hostage, and a right-wing newspaper columnist are among the high-profile personalities emerging as potential challengers for seats held by discredited MPs accused of making expenses claims to pay “costs” ranging from extensive home decorations to cleaning a moat and building a duck house in a pond.

In a country not unaccustomed to the impact of celebrity candidates such as California’s “Governator” Arnold Schwarzenegger, the development may already have claimed its first scalp.

Margaret Moran, an MP for the ruling Labour Party, announced on Thursday that she would step down at the next general election.

Esther Rantzen, a broadcaster who made her name fronting a popular television show championing consumer rights, had threatened to stand against Ms. Moran if she insisted on defending her seat after it was revealed that she had claimed £22,500 ($36,360) in expenses for treating dry rot in a house that was neither in her constituency nor near parliament in London.

Moran's not the only one
Two other MPs who have faced criticism over their expense claims also announced on Thursday they would leave parliament. Conservative MPs Julie Kirkbride and Christopher Fraser said they would step down. Mr. Fraser, who claimed 1,800 pounds ($2,866) in expenses for trees and fencing, said however that his decision was linked to his wife's health rather than his expense claims.

They are just the latest casualties in an affair which has so far seen at least 11 parliamentarians declare that they will step down since the Daily Telegraph began publishing details of the leaked expenses claims three weeks ago.

“I was inspired by sheer rage,” says Ms. Rantzen, who may run as a candidate. “I spent 40 years or more as a journalist and broadcaster and during that time I have thought about getting involved in our parliamentary system but could not find a single party whose manifesto I could swallow whole. Now I feel that there is a real and important role for independent members of parliament because of the scandalous abuse of taxpayer’s money.”

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