Kate, William, and baby make three: Do you know the youngest British royals? A quiz.

2. If not for the queen's recent decree, a daughter of Kate and William would not be a 'princess,' but rather:

Under a 1917 decree issued by Elizabeth’s grandfather, George V, only Kate and William’s eldest son would be a “prince” - a subsequent son would be only a “lord” and any daughter would be a “lady.” Elizabeth’s decree overrides the 1917 rule, and grants every child of Kate and William the title of “prince” or “princess.”

Under a 1917 decree issued by Elizabeth’s grandfather, George V, only Kate and William’s eldest son would be a “prince” - a subsequent son would be only a “lord” and any daughter would be a “lady.” Elizabeth’s decree overrides the 1917 rule, and grants every child of Kate and William the title of “prince” or “princess.”

Under a 1917 decree issued by Elizabeth’s grandfather, George V, only Kate and William’s eldest son would be a “prince” - a subsequent son would be only a “lord” and any daughter would be a “lady.” Elizabeth’s decree overrides the 1917 rule, and grants every child of Kate and William the title of “prince” or “princess.”

Under a 1917 decree issued by Elizabeth’s grandfather, George V, only Kate and William’s eldest son would be a “prince” - a subsequent son would be only a “lord” and any daughter would be a “lady.” Elizabeth’s decree overrides the 1917 rule, and grants every child of Kate and William the title of “prince” or “princess.”

Alastair Grant/AP
(Read caption)

A countess

 

A duchess

 

A lady

 

Nothing; she would not have gotten any title.

 
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