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Do you understand the Syria conflict? Take the quiz

The Syrian conflict began in March 2011 and, despite initial hopes and predictions, has since devolved into civil war. Syria's leader, Bashar al-Assad, has doggedly clung to power. The opposition has splintered into rival groups. International powers have bickered and jockeyed. An end does not appear near. How much do you know about this almost three-year crisis? 

- Staff Writer

1. In 1982, the current Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s father, Hafez al-Assad, was in power. How did the 1982 Muslim Brotherhood uprising in the city of Hama, Syria, end?

In 1982, Hafez al-Assad ordered the Syrian military to put down a brewing Muslim Brotherhood rebellion there. Some 10,000 to 20,000 people, most of them civilians, were massacred when they stormed the city. The event is now often cited as an example of the lengths to which the Syrian government will go to hold on to power. Hama has become a major opposition center in the current conflict and has been the target of several government assaults.

In 1982, Hafez al-Assad ordered the Syrian military to put down a brewing Muslim Brotherhood rebellion there. Some 10,000 to 20,000 people, most of them civilians, were massacred when they stormed the city. The event is now often cited as an example of the lengths to which the Syrian government will go to hold on to power. Hama has become a major opposition center in the current conflict and has been the target of several government assaults.

In 1982, Hafez al-Assad ordered the Syrian military to put down a brewing Muslim Brotherhood rebellion there. Some 10,000 to 20,000 people, most of them civilians, were massacred when they stormed the city. The event is now often cited as an example of the lengths to which the Syrian government will go to hold on to power. Hama has become a major opposition center in the current conflict and has been the target of several government assaults.

AP
(Read caption)

Major political reforms: President Hafez al-Assad passed laws that redistributed power in the government, giving Sunni Muslims more voice.

 

A bloodbath: Hafez al-Assad sent troops storming into the city, with orders to massacre.

 

Economic appeasement: Hafez al-Assad ordered bread prices to be subsidized in order to quell burgeoning resentment of his regime and support of the Muslim Brotherhood's platform.

 
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