Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


The faith factor: A Santorum voter trusts conservative values

Faith is a big factor in Santorum voter Brian Weldy's politics: He believes that if Christians do right, economic recovery will follow.

By Correspondent / April 2, 2012



Nashville, Tenn.

Brian Weldy considers his presidential candidates logically, as befits his training as a chemical engineer. Married, and the father of three sons, he looks for leadership as evidenced by specifics: a strong moral compass, a consistently held and clearly communicated bedrock of principles, a vision for the future, and the ability to carry that vision forward. He wants the principles to be in line with those of the country's Founders, and the moral compass to be in line with God.

Skip to next paragraph

"Absolutely important in a leader is a person who prays to God for wisdom and direction in how to lead this country," he says. "It's great if he's a Christian, but not really essential."

His issues?

Test your religious knowledge: Are you smarter than an atheist?

"Can [the candidate] effectively carry forth the things our nation was founded on?" asks Mr. Weldy. To him, this means freedom: national freedom, political freedom, and individual freedom. That can't happen, he says, without smaller debt, smaller government, and the ability to clearly understand and trust the vision for the future that government leadership is communicating.

Weldy, who grew up in the Black Hills of South Dakota, became a Christian while a student at South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. His belief is not tied to a denomination, but rather to a relationship with Jesus in which the believer is invited, as described in Matthew 22:37 and 39, to "Love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul and with all your mind" and "Love your neighbor as yourself."

"This," says Weldy, "is the prescription to each of us and will ultimately lead towards healing our nation and impacting the world."

Now an executive with a health-care company, Weldy has relocated often during his career. When they came to Nashville 15 years ago, he and his wife sought a church that put its resources in mission work. The church that fit the bill, and which cares for the poor – as near as Nashville and as far away as Africa – happened to be Southern Baptist, a first for Weldy. As with many believers, the Bible – not the church – is central to his spiritual walk. He regularly studies the Scriptures and discusses them with others, weighing his own life against scriptural values and adjusting where need be. He expects that – for himself and his presidential choice – a person's "actions reflect that they abide in faith."

Permissions

Read Comments

View reader comments | Comment on this story

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer

 

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Danny Bent poses at the starting line of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass.

After the Boston Marathon bombings, Danny Bent took on a cross-country challenge

The athlete-adventurer co-founded a relay run called One Run for Boston that started in Los Angeles and ended at the marathon finish line to raise funds for victims.

 
 
Become a fan! Follow us! Google+ YouTube See our feeds!