Subscribe

Newest AMC drama 'Feed the Beast' keeps food at the center

'Feed' centers on two friends (David Schwimmer and Jim Sturgess) who open a restaurant in the Bronx. 

  • close
    'Feed the Beast' stars Jim Sturgess.
    Frank Ockenfels/AMC/AP
    View Caption
  • About video ads
    View Caption
of

Food is at the heart of AMC's drama "Feed The Beast," where family, fatherhood, friendship, and fate converge at a fledgling restaurant in yet another new role for David Schwimmer in his life post-"Friends."

"Feed the Beast," premiering on June 5 on cable network AMC, follows two friends, Tommy (Schwimmer) and Dion (Jim Sturgess), both at respective low points in their lives.

The two attempt to reverse their respective fortunes by opening a restaurant together, named after Tommy's late wife, in New York's Bronx neighborhood.

Recommended: The 20 best TV sitcoms of all time – readers' choice

"The food represents life, like a life force, and the whole premise of the show, at least the first season, is pulling Tommy out of this stagnant lifeless state he's in," Schwimmer told Reuters.

To most people, Schwimmer is best known as Ross Geller from NBC's hit sitcom "Friends," but the 49-year-old actor has also turned director for films such as "Run Fatboy Run" and most recently has been earning Emmy buzz for his portrayal as lawyer Robert Kardashian in FX's "The People v. O.J. Simpson."

The show comes at a time where the growing foodie scene in New York has divided locals as talented, innovative chefs have been at the forefront of the city's gentrification.

"The Bronx is beautiful and people don't know it because people don't go to the Bronx," said Clyde Phillips, writer and executive producer of "Feed The Beast."

"It's good news and bad news about gentrification. It brings business and money and jobs there, but it also displaces families and upsets the schools, ecosystem, and we address both sides of that in the show."

About these ads
Sponsored Content by LockerDome
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
FREE Newsletters
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Save for later

Save
Cancel

Saved ( of items)

This item has been saved to read later from any device.
Access saved items through your user name at the top of the page.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You reached the limit of 20 saved items.
Please visit following link to manage you saved items.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You have already saved this item.

View Saved Items

OK