Subscribe

Iced nectarine green tea

Cool off your Fourth of July party with a tall glass of fruity iced tea.

  • close
    This iced tea combo is so simple to make, boil sugar with pureed nectarine and combine with your favorite brewed green tea.
    The Kitchen Paper
    View Caption
  • About video ads
    View Caption
of

Happy 4th of July, everybody! We got up at the nice early hour of 6:50 a.m. in order to go on a long bike ride before the day heats up too much, which was definitely a smart choice. I can feel the heat coming, which is why we’re soon heading out to the river before a barbecue tonight. Can a holiday get much better than that? I think not. Except maybe if I could spend half the day reading (I’m hooked on a book I CANNOT PUT DOWN!).

This iced tea is not only the first drink (other than smoothies) recipe I’ve put here on the ol’ blog, but the first time I’ve ever made ice tea. Whaaat? Yeah, we just didn’t really drink the stuff growing up – so I’ve always kind of considered it a foreign substance. I didn’t realize it was so popular until I went to college in St. Louis and EVERYONE drank it. Who knew? Not me.

This drink is SUPER easy to make. Make the tea. Cool the tea. Boil some sugar with pureed nectarine. Combine, ice, serve, enjoy! If you’re into sweet tea, go for the 3/4 cup of sugar. If your’e more of an unsweetened-tea-type, go for 1/4 (or omit completely!). The nectarines give it a sweetness already, so it’s really good either way.

Recommended: 10 red, white, and blue desserts

Iced nectarine green tea

water
4 green tea bags
1/4 to 3/4 cups sugar
3 ripe nectarines, pitted and chopped
ice
mint sprigs for garnish

1. Place the green tea into a large (at least 4 cup) container and wet with 1/4 cup of cold water.

2. Bring 4 cups of water to a boil, then pour over the wet tea bags. Let steep for 1-2 minutes, then squeeze and remove the tea bags.

3. In a small saucepan over medium heat, combine the sugar with 1 cup of water.

4. While the sugar water heats, puree the nectarines with a blender (I used my hand blender). Once the sugar has dissolved completely, add the nectarine puree to the saucepan.

5. Cook for 10 minutes, letting it gently bubble but not go too crazy. Stir occasionally. The mixture should be thick and syrupy.
Let everything cool before combining, stirring well, and adding ice.

6. Serve with mint sprigs and extra sliced nectarines.

Related post on The Kitchen Paper: Watermelon mint shake

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of food bloggers. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by The Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own and they are responsible for the content of their blogs and their recipes. All readers are free to make ingredient substitutions to satisfy their dietary preferences, including not using wine (or substituting cooking wine) when a recipe calls for it. To contact us about a blogger, click here.

About these ads
Sponsored Content by LockerDome
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
FREE Newsletters
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Save for later

Save
Cancel

Saved ( of items)

This item has been saved to read later from any device.
Access saved items through your user name at the top of the page.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You reached the limit of 20 saved items.
Please visit following link to manage you saved items.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You have already saved this item.

View Saved Items

OK