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Roasted asparagus mimosas

Add to the classic asparagus mimosa by roasting the asparagus to deepen the flavor.

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    Asparagus mimosa are named for the hard-boiled egg adorning the spears, which resembles the white-and-yellow mimosa flower.
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The true culinary harbinger of spring – asparagus. When the tender stems push their way up through the dirt and out to the market, I really feel like we can start celebrating spring. Asparagus on the plate and buttercups in a vase mean soft days and gentle nights before the heat of summer truly starts. Color comes back, and the gray days of winter are behind us.

Asparagus mimosa is a classic preparation, but I like to mix it up a bit by roasting the asparagus to deepen the flavor and bring out the natural sweetness. I up the spring factor by tossing the spears with a simple dressing bright with lemon. The grated hard-boiled eggs are where the name mimosa comes from – the yellow and white is meant to look like a shower of mimosa petals. A platter of asparagus mimosa is a gorgeous addition to a brunch buffet table at any spring celebration.

Asparagus mimosa
Serves 6

For the asparagus:
1 pound asparagus
2 tablespoons olive oil
salt and pepper

For the dressing:
Juice of one medium lemon (about 3 tablespoons)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
2 hard boiled eggs

1. Heat to oven to 400 degrees F. Break any thick woody stems from the asparagus by just snapping them off. Place the asparagus on a rimmed baking sheet and then toss with the oil until each spear is coated. Spread the spears in one even layer. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and roast until tender, but still with some bite left to them, about 12 to 15 minutes.

2. While the asparagus are cooking, whisk together the lemon juice, olive oil, and mustard until smooth and emulsified. Remove the baked asparagus to a platter and toss with the dressing.

3. Cut the eggs in half and pop out the yolks. Press the whites, one half at a time, through a wire mesh strainer, then do the same for the yolks. Use a spatula or the back of a spoon to push them through. I like to do this onto a plate into a pile of whites and pile of yolks, then carefully arrange them over the asparagus.

4. The asparagus can be roasted and dressed a few hours ahead. Add the eggs just before serving.

Notes: In the picture above, I added some color with a few cherry tomatoes and some chive blossoms I purchased at the farmers market.

Related post on The Runaway Spoon: Buttery lemon dill stuffed eggs

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of food bloggers. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by The Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own and they are responsible for the content of their blogs and their recipes. All readers are free to make ingredient substitutions to satisfy their dietary preferences, including not using wine (or substituting cooking wine) when a recipe calls for it. To contact us about a blogger, click here.

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