Too much leftover Halloween candy? Use it to make a delicious hot drink.

Halloween hot chocolate (think: liquid candy) is a great way to use up Halloween treats.

By , The Runaway Spoon

  • close
    Blend together your leftover chocolate candy with creamy warm milk to make a rich hot chocolate drink.
    View Caption

I see lots of recipe for using up leftover Halloween candy. I’m not sure I see the point, as just eating it straight is generally fine with me. Mind you, not in one sitting, but over time, stashed in drawers and cabinets.

But I do want to make my contribution with this creamy, rich hot chocolate. Make it as soon as the little monsters come in from the trick-or-treating chill, or as a special, after-school treat later in the week.

You must use soft candy that will melt, and nuts are too chunky. Milky Way, Rolo, Kisses, Reese’s, Hershey’s Milk or Special Dark all work beautifully. The final product may not be a chocolaty brown depending on the type of candy used, but it will still be delicious. Using the blender makes a creamy drink with everything smoothly combined, plus it creates a nice foamy top.

Recommended: Are you a real foodie? Take our quiz!

Halloween Hot Chocolate (Liquid Candy)

1/4 cup heavy cream

1 cup milk

1 ounce chocolate candy (4 mini-size squares)

Combine the cream and milk in a small saucepan and heat over medium just until bubbles form on the surface. Do not boil.

Unwrap the candy and place in the carafe of a blender. Pour in the warm milk and leave for a few seconds to soften the candy bars. Vent the blender lid and carefully hold it with a folded tea towel. Blend until smooth and frothy. Serve immediately, or pour back into the saucepan and reheat gently if needed.

Makes one serving, can be doubled or tripled

Sign-up to receive a weekly collection of recipes from Stir It Up! by clicking here.

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of food bloggers. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by The Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own and they are responsible for the content of their blogs and their recipes. All readers are free to make ingredient substitutions to satisfy their dietary preferences, including not using wine (or substituting cooking wine) when a recipe calls for it. To contact us about a blogger, click here.

Share this story:
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...