How to roast a pumpkin

Preparing your own fresh pumpkin purée is easier than you think, if you can wrestle your pumpkins away from the squirrels.

By , The Gourmand Mom

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    Once roasted, the tender insides of the pumpkin will scoop out with ease to produce a purée that can be used for pies and soups.
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Last fall, like many families, we purchased several pumpkins to adorn our front steps throughout October. They stayed out there for a month, until one afternoon, we opened the door to find the remnants of what used to be the Frankenstein pumpkin. We were all a bit flummoxed upon finding the remains. The boys were devastated. What horrific event could have caused the brutal destruction of our little pumpkin; so thoroughly ravaged on our front steps. We all felt a bit violated. But, my husband dutifully cleaned up the remains and we did our best to put the past behind us.

And then, the very next day, the vicious pumpkin villain returned.

Let’s just call him Squirrely. Squirrely stood there on our front steps, staring at me with his beady little eyes, looking all cute with his fluffy tail. And then he strutted himself over to the next largest pumpkin, and shamelessly went to work. So strong was his passion for pumpkin, that he worked diligently at his task for at least an hour, as we all stood staring in awe. Squirrely was clearly a master of pumpkin. To his credit, he waited a month before devouring our decor.

Recommended: 13 Halloween treats

Clearly, I didn't use any of those pumpkins to make my pumpkin pie. Luckily, our grocery store is well-stocked with pumpkins.

For the purpose of making pumpkin purée for pies or other pumpkin desserts, your best bet is to pick up a Pie Pumpkin or Sugar Pumpkin. They are smaller and will produce a less watery, more flavorful result. When my mom prepares the pumpkin for her pies, she typically prepares the purée in a similar fashion to mashed potatoes. She cuts the pumpkin into chunks, removes the skin, boils, then mashes. It’s a technique which has always worked well for her. However, an easier alternative to chopping a hard pumpkin into pieces and removing all of the skin is to roast the pumpkins. Once roasted, the tender insides will scoop out with ease. Here is a step-by-step guide on how to prepare fresh pumpkin purée by roasting.

Roasting A Pumpkin to Make Purée
Two small Pie Pumpkins should produce about 3-4 cups pumpkin puree.

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Thoroughly rinse the pumpkins.

2. Ideally, cut the pumpkins in half, from the stem to the base. However, if you happened to purchase the world’s hardest pumpkins or perhaps left your pumpkins in the freezing car overnight, you may have to settle for simply sawing and prying off the top. Don’t worry, if you cannot manage to cut your pumpkins in half, rest assured that the pumpkins will roast just as well with only the tops removed.

3. Use a spoon or ice cream scoop to remove all of the seeds and stringy parts from the pumpkin. Save the seeds for roasting.

4. Place the pumpkin upside down on a baking sheet (cut sides down, if you were able to cut your pumpkin in half). Fill the bottom of the baking sheet with a thin (1/4 inch) layer of water.

5. Roast for about 90 minutes. Test by inserting a fork into the inside of the pumpkin. It should be quite tender. Allow to cool.

6. Scoop out the tender insides.

7. Use a blender, food processor, or immersion blender to puree until smooth. Refrigerate until ready to use.

Related post: Roasted Pumpkin Caramel Bisque

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