Pickling and canning? Of course you can!

You can conquer canning. Here are 12 recipes for sweet jams, savory chutneys, and crunchy pickles a plenty that will leave your mouth watering and your can-do attitude soaring.

By , Contributor

Fresh dill pickles need no canning

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    Kirby cucumbers become fresh dill pickles virtually overnight with vinegar, herbs, and spices.
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Makes 16 pickle spears

1-1/2 cups distilled white vinegar (see Kitchen Notes)
3 tablespoons sugar
3 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds (I used brown mustard seeds)
1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
1-1/2 cups water, plus extra
4 Kirby cucumbers, about 1 pound total
1 jalapeño pepper, sliced into thin rings
3 to 4 cloves garlic, coarsely chopped
12 sprigs fresh dill (plus more, if desired)
Special equipment: 2 wide-mouthed jars tall enough to accommodate the cucumber spears.

1. Combine vinegar, sugar, salt and coriander, mustard and fennel seeds in a medium sauce pan. Bring the vinegar to a boil over medium high flame, stirring frequently, until sugar and salt dissolve. Remove from heat and cool completely.

2. Wash and dry the jars. Rinse the cucumbers carefully and pat them dry. Quarter the cucumbers lengthwise and pack slices into the jars. Divide the chopped garlic and jalapeño slices between the jars, tucking between the cucumber slices. Tuck six sprigs of dill into each jar.

3. Add 1-1/2 cups of water to the vinegar. Divide vinegar mixture between jars, making sure the seeds get divided as well. If necessary, add a little water to completely submerge the cucumber slices. I added about 1/4 cup to each jar. Close jars tightly and shake to mix in added water. Refrigerate at least 24 hours before eating. Pickles should keep up to a month refrigerated.

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