Local Hot Bubble

New findings from the NASA-funded Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) mission have resolved a decades-old puzzle about a fog of low-energy X-rays observed over the entire sky. Using refurbished detectors first flown on a NASA sounding rocket in the 1970s, astronomers have now confirmed the long-held suspicion that much of this glow stems from a region of million-degree interstellar plasma known as the local hot bubble, or LHB

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New findings from the NASA-funded Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) mission have resolved a decades-old puzzle about a fog of low-energy X-rays observed over the entire sky. Using refurbished detectors first flown on a NASA sounding rocket in the 1970s, astronomers have now confirmed the long-held suspicion that much of this glow stems from a region of million-degree interstellar plasma known as the local hot bubble, or LHB
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