Google to pay $22.5M over allegations of secret tracking: source

Google has settled a privacy case for $22.5 million, according to a source.

By

  • close
    A man walks by an advertisement of Apple's iPad in Shanghai, China.
    View Caption

Google has agreed to pay a $22.5 million fine to settle allegations that it broke a privacy promise by secretly tracking the online activities of millions of people who use Apple's Safari web browser.

That's according to a person familiar with Google Inc.'s negotiations to settle a case brought by the Federal Trade Commission. The person who spoke to The Associated Press Tuesday asked not to be identified because the agreement still needs to be approved by the FTC.

The Wall Street Journal first reported on the pending settlement.

Recommended: Five countries challenging Google

If approved, the $22.5 million fine would be the largest penalty ever imposed by the FTC.

The agency has been investigating whether unauthorized changes Google made to Safari's privacy settings violated a recent FTC agreement prohibiting the company from misleading consumers.

Share this story:
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...