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Angry Birds: Play online for free, thanks to Google

Angry Birds is now available on the Chrome Web Store, Rovio announced today.

By Matthew Shaer / May 12, 2011

Angry Birds makes its debut on the Chrome Web Store this week.

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Angry Birds is finally making a landing on the Web. For newbies – and considering the popularity of the game, which extends across countries and continents, we're not sure how many of you there are out there – Angry Birds is a point-and-click strategy game. It took off on iPhone, before moving to a range of other platforms, including Android, and in the year and a half since launch, it has been downloaded tens of millions of times.

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But until this week, there was no Web version of the game. Enter the Chrome-branded Angry Birds, which was developed specially for Google's Chrome OS. (The timing is not accidental – Google has just unveiled a pair of cheap, fast "Chromebooks.") "This is only a beta release of the game, and so far we have 63 levels of the original game available, with an additional 7 special Chrome levels," Rovio reps wrote on the official company blog.

VIDEO: Angry Birds birthday cake: Possibly the best food fight in history

More levels are reportedly in the works. So what does the introduction of a Chrome version of Angry Birds mean for Rovio? Well, for one, it means the Angry Birds domination of the Web and portable devices is almost complete. Here's the link to Angry Birds online.

As we reported back in March, Rovio is apparently prepping a Facebook edition of Angry Birds for release sometime this year – and the port will involve some kind of "collaborative" functionality. Angry Birds invasion!

In a related development – and hat tip to CNET for this one – a Finnish company called OptoFidelity has built a robot that excels at the Rovio title. How good? Three-stars-on-every-level good. "As OptoFidelity does a lot of work with touch panel testing and performance testing for mobile devices using video and optical measuring systems, it wasn’t hard to implement an application for this particular need," company reps wrote in a statement.

Think you can beat the Angry Birds-playing robot? Drop us a line in the comments section. And in the meantime, for more tech news – Angry Birds-centric or not – sign up for the free Innovation newsletter, which is emailed out every Wednesday.

VIDEO: Angry Birds birthday cake: Possibly the best food fight in history

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