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Moving our economy forward

If the president is serious about making our country competitive, he will help to overturn EPA regulations that will hurt the US economy, Tracey writes. 

By Evan TraceyAmerican Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE) / November 9, 2012

President Barack Obama speaks about the economy and the deficit Friday in the East Room of the White House in Washington. If the president is serious about helping families, Tracey writes, then he will keep their electricity costs down by keeping coal a central part of the American energy mix.

Jacquelyn Martin/AP

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With the election now behind us, we are looking for positive next steps to get our country’s economy moving.

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Senior Vice President for Communications, American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE)

Mr. Tracey oversees the strategy on how to communicate the importance of electricity from coal and the value of investments in clean coal technology. He has two decades of political, legislative and issue research experience and has provided strategic media analysis for a number of trade associations, foundations, Fortune 500 companies, political party committees, the national press, academic institutions, as well as hundreds of national, statewide and local political campaigns.

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Seven EPA regulations will cost the country more than $200 billion and cause at least 700,000 jobs to disappear. If the president is serious about making our country competitive, he will help to overturn these rules. If the president is serious about making our manufacturers more competitive, he will give them more long-term  certainty and keep their costs down by overturning these rules. And if the president is serious about helping families, then he will keep their electricity costs down by keeping coal a central part of the American energy mix.

During the campaign, we heard the president tout his support of coal, and we are hopeful that he will work moving forward to let the coal industry once again thrive. But we have reason wary: While  the president was talking, cabinet-level agencies were working on onerous regulations that will hurt the coal industry, our economy, and the families and businesses that depend on the both.

We are certain, however, that if regulations continue to harm our economy, our many advocates will continue to help make our  need for coal an important topic for the next four years.

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