Today's news briefing: domestic terror plots, video games, and Obama says no to settlements

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Here's what we're working on today:

In the US ...

• Terror on the home front? Ron Scherer reports on an alleged plot to bomb buildings in New York City and shoot down military aircraft upstate. The allegations have resulted in the arrest of four men, reviving concerns about domestic terrorism.

President Obama had some strong words this morning regarding how to bring justice to detainees held at Guantánamo and the legal and political implications of the goal, reports Warren Richey.

• How critical should elected officials be? Gail Russell Chaddock explores the Republicans' ability to make hay of Speaker Nancy Pelosi's criticism of the Central Intelligence Agency. What does this say about American willingness to be wary of how government entities wield power?

Overseas ...

• Stop the settlements: That's the mandate Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu received during his visit with Mr. Obama this week, Joshua Mitnick reports. But Israel hasn't managed to halt settlements on the West Bank, even under Labor governments. Is it feasible now?

• Anand Gopal reports on a spike in IED (improvised explosive device) attacks in Afghanistan. On a positive note, the United States has reduced the bombs' success rate by 20 percent in the past year.

• History is in the eye of the beholders – at least that's what the Kremlin seems to believe. The governing body recently convened a panel of historians to rewrite/correct Soviet history. The effort is fueling flames across Russia, reports Fred Weir from Moscow.

Michael Seaver looks at an ugly side of Ireland's history: rampant abuse in church-run schools, according to a new report.

• Many Taiwanese are observing the high-profile corruption trial of former President Chen Shui-bian, reports Jonathan Adams. But claims of ruling-party efforts to politicize the courts has prompted complaints from Chen supporters and legal scholars alike that the judicial system is being tainted.

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