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Opinion

Repealing tax breaks for oil companies: common sense vs. congressional thuggery

The oil industry is no more to blame for the price of gas than Kay Jewelers is to blame for the high price of gold. Any tax changes should be done as part of broader corporate tax reform, which will apply universally, and not just reflect a wave of political antagonism.

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Currently, their work abroad is taxed heavily by host countries, so our government grants these companies deductions on the US taxes owed on that foreign income. This avoids double-taxing the same work, but the president and some in Congress want to do away with it. This will have grave consequences for the competitiveness of American business and our future access to needed energy supplies.

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The idea that another existing tax break – the Section 199 domestic manufacturing deduction – will be restructured to exclude the oil industry is a horrible precedent: taxing someone for who they are instead of what they are doing. In fact, every US manufacturer receives this legitimate business deduction. This proposal is more reminiscent of European monarchies levying taxes on their enemies than a broad, democratic tax bill.

Why target just one industry?

Additionally, targeting an industry solely because it is currently profitable is hard to defend. No one is suggesting that farmers should have their tax bills raised when crop prices are high, or that the automobile industry – prospering because their Japanese competitors were hit by a tsunami – should be saddled with an extraordinary tax bill.

There is an old industrial policy theory that states governments should support “sunrise” industries at the expense of “sunset” sectors, but this is a case of wanting to penalize winners to support losers.

And the pretense that the money would go toward renewable energy investment – as Sen. Baucus’s measure proposes – should be considered insulting, since money is fungible, and the higher revenue is a completely separate issue from any spending plans. Renewable energy investment should stand or fall on its own merits, not whether it is being funded by the oil industry.

What is left? Ending these particular tax deductions for the oil industry will not bankrupt it by any means, but the practice of penalizing a specific industry because it is profitable (and, frankly, politically unpopular) opens a door we should not go through. Any tax changes should be done as part of broader corporate tax reform, which will apply universally, and not just reflect a wave of political antagonism.

Michael Lynch, a lecturer at Vienna University in Austria, is president of Strategic Economic and Energy Research (SEER) in Winchester, Mass.

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