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Twenty things you should never buy full price (and where to get them for less)

Certain items, like video game consoles, electronic devices, rarely go on sale. But some things go on sale so frequently, you might as well ignore the full price altogether. 

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I have a confession to make: I, a decorated deal hunter and savings-savvy shopper, once paid full price for a pair of boots. It wasn't my fault, really! They only had one pair left and it was my size! When those boots sold out without ever going on sale, I knew I'd made the right decision. 

Certain items, like video game consoles, electronic devices, and my beautiful boots, rarely go on sale. You'll have to look at credit card offers, cash back opportunities, and retailers with free shipping or no sales tax to come out with any savings, unless you get lucky during a rare promotion. But some things go on sale so frequently, you might as well ignore the full price altogether. Feel free to turn your nose up at the price tag on bedding sets, point and laugh at the vacuum cleaners listed at full price at your local department store, and if anyone ever tries to get you to pay more than $10 for a washcloth, feel free to tell them that you can just as easily wipe your face off with a $1 bill.

So how can the average person decide know what kinds of things they should never buy at full price? We compiled the infographic below using data on our readers' 20 favorite kinds of products. The typical sale price is defined as the price you can find on that item at least once every month. If you know you'll need something by the end of the year but don't need it urgently, you'll want to focus on our lowest price of the year, and plan to check Brad's Deals around that time. Prices can change, and we can't make any promises, but this will give you a good idea of how much you can save if you are actively looking for sale prices.

Brad's Deals

This article first appeared in Brad's Deals.

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best personal finance bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger's own site by clicking on the link in the blog description box above.

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