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Mercedes-Benz confirms: It's moving US headquarters to Atlanta

The rumors about the Mercedes-Benz move have been swirling for some time, and now they've been proven true. Mercedes-Benz's Atlanta relocation is expected to affect 1,000 employees, but it makes sense for many reasons. 

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    A large sign is displayed in front of one of the buildings at the sprawling U.S. headquarters for Mercedes-Benz on Mercedes Drive, in Montvale, N.J. The German luxury automobile maker said Tuesday, Jan. 6, 2015, that it's moving its U.S. headquarters from New Jersey to Atlanta, in part to be closer to its manufacturing facility in Alabama. The decision comes after weeks of lobbying - some of it public - by New Jersey officials who sought to keep the company in Montvale, at a campus that's about a five-minute drive from BMW's North American headquarters.
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Mercedes-Benz has announced plans to move its U.S. headquarters to Atlanta, Georgia, surprising absolutely no one.

The German automaker had been considering the move for some time, quietly shopping a number of sites for potential HQs. Back in December, rumors began swirling that the company had settled on Atlanta, and now, the gossip has proven true.

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The announcement is undoubtedly a blow to New Jersey, especially residents of Montvale, the center of Mercedes-Benz's U.S. operations for some 50 years. However, as we discussed several weeks ago, the move to Georgia makes sense for many reasons, including Atlanta's proximity to Mercedes-Benz U.S. International, the company's manufacturing facility that sits a short drive away in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 

Furthermore, Atlanta has an increasingly large pool of auto industry workers, thanks to companies like Porsche that have put down roots there. The move will also put Mercedes in closer contact with the growing Southern market. And not least of all, Georgia is a right-to-work state, which gives unions less power.

Some of those factors are reiterated by Stephen Cannon, President and CEO of MBUSA: 

"Atlanta is a premier city which places us closer to our ever-growing Southeast customer base, our port in Brunswick, Georgia, and to Mercedes-Benz U.S. International, our Alabama manufacturing facility, which accounts for half of the vehicles we sell here in the U.S.  For our employees, Atlanta offers a strong quality of life, terrific schools and wonderful cultural and recreational opportunities."

Unlike Toyota, which expects a longish, drawn-outish move to its new headquarters in Plano, Texas, Mercedes-Benz's relocation is on the fast-track. Some employees will move to Atlanta as soon as July of this year, operating out of temporary facilities until a new campus is completed in "early 2017". 

According to our sources, the relocation deal is said to be worth about $60 million in tax breaks from the state of Georgia. MBUSA hasn't revealed the exact location of its new headquarters, but it's believed to be near Perimeter, very close to the homebases of Porsche and Auto Trader.

The move is expected to affect 1,000 employees, though Mercedes says that it will maintain a presence in both Montvale and Robbinsville, New Jersey.

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best auto bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger's own site by clicking on the link in the blog description box above.

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