Ford announces recalls for nearly 101,000 cars due to safety issues

Ford is recalling nearly 101,000 North American vehicles, including the Ford Edge and Ford Flex from recent model years. Ford has issued six recalls due to safety issues, including potentially losing drive function, rolling away while parked on a hill, and having gas tanks more prone to leakage.

By , The Car Connection

  • close
    Ford Assembly workers Anthony Chwalek (L ) and Tom Downs install a battery charger underneath a Ford Focus Electric vehicle at the Michigan Assembly Plant in Wayne, Michigan November 7, 2012. Ford Motor Company has issued six new recalls for roughly 101,000 North American vehicles.
    View Caption

Ford Motor Company has issued six new recalls – some big, some small – for roughly 101,000 North American vehicles. According to Detroit News, the recalls affect a wide range of passenger and commercial models:

Recall #1: 2012-2014 Ford Edge; 2013-2014 Ford Ford Flex, Police Interceptor, Taurus; 2013-2014 Lincoln MKS, Lincoln MKT; 2014 Lincoln MKXUnits affected: 92,000 

The largest of Ford's recalls stems from a driveshaft problem in the vehicles listed above -- specifically, a flaw with the right-side halfshaft. The automaker says that the vehicles could experience a "loss of drive function". They could even roll away if parked on a hill without the emergency brake applied. Dealers will inspect the faulty part and replace it, if necessary. 

Recall #2: 2014 Ford EscapeUnits affected: 2,100

This recall only affects Escape vehicles manufactured between October 15 and October 22, 2013 at Ford's Louisville Assembly Plant. In some of those units, the bond securing the panoramic rooftop glass to the vehicle may have improperly cured. That could allow the glass to leak, create additional noise in the cabin, or in extreme cases, force the panel to separate from the vehicle. Owners will be asked to take their Escapes to Ford dealers, who will replace the rooftop panels, free of charge.

Recommended: Top 5 product recalls in US history

Recall #3: 2014 Ford FiestaUnits affected: 197

A small number of 2014 vehicles may be missing a layer of adhesive on the gas tank. Without that adhesive, the tanks are more prone to leakage and, subsequently, catching fire. Ford hasn't indicated exactly which 2014 Fiestas are included in this recall, but given the small number of vehicles affected, it's likely limited to models manufactured on very specific dates. 

RECALL #4: 2014 Ford Transit ConnectUnits affected: 368

This is probably the simplest of the six recalls, affecting only those vans shipped to Puerto Rico. On those models, Ford used the wrong pictogram label on the brake fluid reservoir cap, which doesn't include specific text that U.S. law requires. Ford hasn't indicated the fix for the problem, but it's likely as simple as attaching a new label to the cap.

Recall #5: 2011-2014 Ford F59 Commercial Stripped Chassis vehiclesUnits affected: 5,264

In vehicles that operate on roads treated with salt during the winter months, the electrical junction block could short-circuit. That could result in a number of issues, ranging from smoke in the right front wheel well, complete loss of electrical power, or in extreme cases, a fire.

Recall #6: 2014 Ford F53 Motorhome Stripped Chassis and F59 Commercial Stripped Chassis vehiclesUnits affected: 635

The brake calipers on these commercial vehicles may have been improperly constructed, resulting in greater travel of the brake pedal and increased stopping times.

Including these six actions, Ford has recalled about three million vehicles in 2014. That's well below General Motors' 29 million, but hey, the year's not over yet.

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best auto bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger's own site by clicking on the link in the blog description box above.

Share this story:
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
Follow Stories Like This
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...