Subscribe

Nine times you should demand a refund

When you purchase a product or a service, you expect to get your money's worth. Sometimes that does not happen. When is it okay to demand a refund?

1. Departure taxes on an unused flight

  • close
    A Delta jet takes off from Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in SeaTac, Washington, on March 24, 2015.
    Elaine Thompson/AP/File
    View Caption
  • About video ads
    View Caption
of

When you spend your hard-earned money on a product or service, you expect a certain level of quality — and when that quality falls short of expectations, it's not unreasonable to think you're entitled to a refund. But not every situation qualifies. So when should you stand your ground for your money back, and when should cut your losses? Take a look at these nine times you should demand a refund— ever so politely, of course.

I once booked a European vacation around the holidays that was supposed to stop in London, Dublin, and Paris, but the last leg of the trip was cancelled due to "weather conditions" according to the evil discount airline that shall remain nameless. The airline offered to fly my friends and me to Rome as penance — which was a nice offer in theory, except we couldn't fly on the dates they suggested — so my flight was essentially a loss since the airline wasn't responsible for acts of God, which, in this case, was fog. I was young and dumb and just accepted the decision.

Maybe that wouldn't have happened if I were friendly with Kyle Stewart, travel editor at UPGRD, at the time. He experienced a similar situation, but walked away a little less broke than I did.

"We had found a very cheap flight to and from London, but once we were abroad we had to make a change and book an alternative separate flight home," he says about his one-time travel plans. "Our tickets were non-refundable, but it is unlawful for the carrier to keep revenue they collect for 'taxes' if you do not actually fly the route. The U.K. has a steep departure tax of nearly $250 each on flights leaving the United Kingdom. Because we did not fly those routes but had paid for the taxes, even on a non-refundable ticket we were able to get the departure tax refunded which nearly paid for our alternative transportation home."

1 of 9
About these ads
Sponsored Content by LockerDome
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
FREE Newsletters
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Save for later

Save
Cancel

Saved ( of items)

This item has been saved to read later from any device.
Access saved items through your user name at the top of the page.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You reached the limit of 20 saved items.
Please visit following link to manage you saved items.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You have already saved this item.

View Saved Items

OK