The job is yours

Bringing a spiritual perspective to daily life

The work I was doing wasn't exactly fulfilling, but writing jobs were hard to come by. I continued writing copy for breakfast cereals and didn't look for another job. Actually, I had so many other things to be concerned about that I put the work situation on a back burner.

One day when I was thinking about these concerns, I read in the Bible, "The Son can do nothing of himself" (John 5:19). I saw that as the child of God, which the Bible states we are, I didn't create or do anything by myself. I reflected what God was doing. My attention was to be centered on God and learning what divine activity really is.

Then as my understanding grew of what it means to be God's reflection and not an object outside divine control, I gained increasing freedom from fear of wrongful employment as well as unemployment. Shortly, I was offered a wonderful job, and I remained in this position for a few years until it was time for us to start a family. Rearing children offered plenty of opportunities for actively reflecting what I was learning about God as my real employer.

It had become increasingly clear that the concept that I could of myself do nothing had a biblical corollary: "I can do all things through Christ which strengtheneth me" (Phil. 4:13). I could do everything that was mine to do.

I found plenty of work to do during those years that I was not employed outside the home. Then, even before I knew that I was ready to be otherwise employed, another wonderful job was offered to me. After that I worked in several different positions, without having to seek them.

Some of these were in the same organization and involved restructuring that moved around other workers as well as myself and made the greatest use of our differing abilities.

Viewed from a spiritual perspective, instead of our having to seek and find employment, employment finds us. That is, each one of us is already employed to represent the divine nature. Without this representation, God would indeed be an abstraction. God is reflected in goodness; His wisdom in good judgment; His omnipotence in action.

A friend who was out of work was cautioned against falling into a state of apathy. "If you have nothing else to do," he was advised, "sweep the sidewalk in front of your house to the corner." I don't know if he did exactly that, but he did heed the advice to keep active and helpful. He was soon gainfully employed again.

Another friend who had been quite successful lost everything and was reduced to standing on street corners selling shoelaces. He preferred doing that to begging. As he stopped rebelling against his circumstances, he began to be grateful for every sale. His circumstances quickly improved.

Replacing apathy and rebellion with action and gratitude is work in itself. Actually, such conscious attention to reflecting and expressing good is the essence of all employment.

Often, as we know, layoffs occur in a particular industry so that hundreds of others are fighting for work in the same job market. The temptation to think and act in a way that is destructively competitive is a trap. As we understand our true identity, we see that each one of us is unique and has a special place to fill. In proving this spiritual fact, we stay flexible, open to taking progressive steps, ones that will bless others as well as ourselves.

The Founder of Christian Science, Mary Baker Eddy, wrote: "The devotion of thought to an honest achievement makes the achievement possible," ("Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures," pg. 199). Devoting thought to achieving our highest purpose, that of being the best reflection of God's qualities possible, engages us in important, remunerative, and fulfilling work. That job is yours today.

Now our Lord Jesus Christ himself, and God, even our Father,
which hath loved us,
and hath given us everlasting consolation and good hope
through grace, comfort
your hearts, and stablish you
in every good word and work.
II Thessalonians 2:16-17

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