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Interview? Who needs an interview?

By Shelley Donald CoolidgeStaff writer of The Christian Science Monitor / April 26, 1999



LOS ANGELES

The hot job market has practically elevated the class of 1999 to celebrity status.

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But that has made some students overly relaxed about job hunting.

OK, so you can always count on some students to delay an update to their rsums until after the pomp and circumstance.

But career counselors worry that students may be getting the wrong message from all the hype about the hot job market. They see too many students deciding to sit back and wait for the recruiters to come to them.

"A lot of students have a false sense of security because the economy is so good," says Camille Luckenbaugh of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Some schools have had to cancel visits from corporate recruiters, she says, because students weren't interested.

At the University of Texas, Austin, some students skipped scheduled interviews with recruiters, says Barbara Santos, director of liberal-arts career services at the university.

"You wouldn't have seen it in 1994," she says.

And she has a new rule. If you're no-show for one campus interview, you become a no-go for any others.

"I worry about complacency," adds Richard Fein, director of placement at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, School of Management. "You don't just want a job, you want a good job. And those are not there for the picking. Those have to be sought."

He started sending letters home to parents alerting them to coming career fairs.

"They're our allies," he says