OUT ON VIDEO

A weekly update of video releases

By , Judy Nichols, and Lisa Leigh Parney

* JUNIOR - (PG-13, MCA Universal Home Video). A university scientist (Arnold Schwarzenegger) and an obstetrician (Danny DeVito) have developed a drug to prevent women from having miscarriages. But the Food and Drug Administration nixed their testing it on mothers-to-be, and the university pulled the plug on funding. So Schwarzenegger decides he'll become artificially pregnant to test the formula. The scenario has the potential to be a real howler - a pregnant man. But instead, it plods through the next nine months dishing out the stereotypical symptoms expectant mothers supposedly experience. Directed by Ivan Reitman.

- Shelley Donald Coolidge

* EAT DRINK MAN WOMAN - (Not rated, Hallmark Home Entertainment). Be prepared for your mouth to water as the camera pans the family feasts of Mr. Chu, who hopes sumptuous food will hold his family of three grown daughters together. But each daughter has a juicy romance simmering, making life less than rosy in the Taipei household. Filmmaker Ang Lee, who delighted US audiences two years ago with ''The Wedding Banquet,'' smartly splices comedy with more serious messages about family relationships and marriage in the '90s. Unexpected twists in the story, along with thoughtful character portrayals, add originality and realism. In Chinese with English subtitles.

Recommended: Arnold Schwarzenegger: His 10 goofiest movie quotes

- Judy Nichols

* THE LAST SEDUCTION - (R, PolyGram Video). In the tradition of film noir, ''The Last Seduction'' starts in fast-paced Manhattan but takes a detour to a small town. A woman, played with low-key yet merciless intensity by Linda Fiorentino, sets out on a course of manipulation and fraud - first against her husband (Bill Pullman), then against her new boyfriend.

The film gained attention at Oscar-nomination time, when a possible nomination for Fiorentino's fiery performance was derailed. The academy declared ''Last Seduction'' ineligible for awards because it premiered on cable TV.

Video renters should be warned: The amoral tone and sexual situations in ''Last Seduction'' put it off-limits for all but the most adventurous.

- Lisa Leigh Parney

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