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News In Brief

By Lawrence J. GoodrichSuzanne MacLachlan, and Peter Nordahl / February 27, 1995



THE WORLD

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US and Chinese officials signed a pact to end Chinese piracy of American movies, music, and other goods. Failure to resolve the dispute would have meant punitive US tariffs on more than $1 billion in Chinese imports. Under the agreement, China will create nationwide task forces to combat intellectual property pirates and launch raids to destroy fake goods.

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Former US President Carter denied he got a chilly reception when he visited Haiti on a three-day fact-finding mission. Carter was accompanied by Senator Nunn and former Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman Powell. Anti-Carter graffiti was splashed around the capital, and no representative of the Haitian government met the Americans at the airport. Carter also denied that he had done anything to try to influence parliamentary and municipal elections, set for June 4.

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A security guard for slain Mexican presidential candidate Luis Donaldo Colosio was arrested in connection with the murder last March. His role in the alleged conspiracy was not immediately known. A suspected gunman was arrested Friday; another was sentenced earlier to 45 years in prison.

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Yemen and Saudi Arabia signed a memorandum of understanding on resolving their six-year-old border dispute. The memorandum calls for committees to demarcate the land and sea borders between the two countries; a military committee to ensure no troop movements take place on the borders; and a committee to develop economic, commercial, and cultural ties between the two countries.

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growing quantities of prescription drugs intended for medicinal use are not adequately policed and are ending up in the hands of the world's drug traffickers, a new report by the United Nations International Narcotics Control Board says.

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Serbs launched a fresh terror campaign against Muslims in northern Bosnia. A UN spokesman said Serb soldiers had beaten Muslim civilians and ransacked their homes. UN flights to Sarajevo airport were suspended after aircraft came under gunfire. The US, meanwhile, said it would consider sending troops to Croatia to protect UN peacekeeping forces if they are forced to withdraw.

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Commerce Secretary Brown denied a New York Times report that the US plans to drop its support for former Mexican President Salinas to head the World Trade Organization. North and South Americans, Asians, and Europeans are divided over who should head the prestigious WTO. Each bloc is backing a regional candidate, but none can win without a consensus.

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The Group of Seven industrial nations wrapped up a three-day mini-summit in Belgium, pledging to work together for a global technological revolution. The countries remained divided over how wide to open markets and how strictly to police cyberspace.

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An electrical short circuit in a remote-control device used to detonate mines triggered an explosion in Chechnya, killing at least 25 Russian soldiers.

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Rival Somali clans battled outside the Mogadishu airport as UN peacekeepers prepared to withdraw from Somalia, CNN said. About 2,000 US marines and Italian soldiers are expected to arrive this week to secure part of Mogadishu's port and airport.

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A North Korean delegation canceled its visit to South Korea, just hours before it was to have crossed the border. The delegation had planned to discuss ''comfort women'' used by Japan in World War II. North Korea said it pulled out because of South Korean government interference. It would have been the first visit in 15 months.

THE US

Debate over the balanced budget amendment is red hot as tomorrow's Senate vote approaches. Senator Moynihan told NBC's ''Meet the Press'' the amendment could be an economic disaster. President Clinton said it would lead to an ''extreme fiscal policy'' set by the courts and the Federal Reserve. Senator Nunn, one of five undecided Democrats, said he wants the amendment changed to keep federal courts out of the fiscal process. Speaker Gingrich offered to meet with Nunn today to discuss a possible compromise. The proposal appears to be one to three votes short of the 67 needed for passage.

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The stock market starts the week coming off record highs two days in a row. The Dow Jones industrial average climbed to 4,011.74 Friday after breaking the 4,000 mark the day before. Stocks and bonds both stumbled early Friday after the Commerce Department said durable-goods orders rose 0.6 percent in January. Economists had expected a slight decline.