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Extend radius of left arm for more power

By Jack Woods / September 16, 1981



Most golfers seem to think they could do with more power, although consistent accuracy is more realistically the name of the game. Now there are various ways whereby power can be added to the swing. But two simplest, in my opinion, are those involving the left upper arm and the right forearm (assuming the golfer is right-handed).

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This time I will deal with the left arm, having discussed the right in a previous column.

The left arm establishes the swing radius, and one way to increase power is to lengthen that radius. Doing so naturally involves the shouler turn which is why I stress the upper arm. The feeling of swinging and turning the upper left arm the maximum amount should result in achieving one's longest swing radius.

For this purpose a flat shoulder turn on the backswing is better than an angled shoulder turn. It gives greater "travel."

However, if one uses a flat backswing shoulder turn, the feeling has to be "round and then under," for the downswing and throughswing shoulder turn is quite steep. With some prayers it is almost vertical -- with Gary Player, Example, and Fuzzy Zoeller For example.

In making a full backswing shoulder turn one must be careful not to sway. The top half of the body turns over the resisting lower half. The angle of the leg from hip to turf is kept constant.

These moves will give maximum radius to the swing. A final power touch can be added through the delayed release of the upper left arm from the place where it touches the top of the rib cage.

But it's the extended radius that does the trick, or most of it. No extra effort is needed. No tense turn. Just the quiet achievement of a nice wide swing.