Cory Monteith Emmys tribute: Symptom of a youth-centric culture?

Cory Monteith, the 'Glee' actor who died in July of a heroin overdose, will receive an individual salute during Sunday's Emmy Awards. Monteith who was 31 had never been nominated for an Emmy, unlike Jack Klugman, of 'The Odd Couple,' who will not receive an individual tribute. 

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP/File
Cory Monteith at the 2012 Do Something awards in Santa Monica, Calif. in August 2012. An Emmys tribute to 'Glee' star Monteith, who died in July from a heroin overdose, has angered some, who point out Monteith had never won an Emmy.

The exclusion of Jack Klugman from an Emmy Awards tribute that includes Cory Monteith is an insult to the memory of the late TV veteran and three-time Emmy winner who starred in "The Odd Couple" and "Quincy M.E.," Klugman's son says.

"I think it's criminal," said Adam Klugman in an interview with The Associated Press. "My dad was at the inception of television and helped build it in the early days."

Ceremony producers announced this week that five individual salutes would be included on Sunday night's Emmy show in addition to the traditional "in memoriam" segment that groups together industry members who died in the past year.

Besides Monteith, the "Glee" star who died in July of a heroin and drug overdose, those to be honored include "The Sopranos" star James Gandolfini; Jean Stapleton of "All in the Family"; comedian and actor Jonathan Winters; and "Family Ties" producer Gary David Goldberg.

Monteith, who was 31 when he died, is by far the youngest of the group. All the others are Emmy winners, while he had yet to be nominated in his abbreviated career.

Emmy nominees who died last year and won't be accorded separate tributes include Larry Hagman of "Dallas" and Charles Durning of "Evening Shade."

Hagman, Durning and Klugman will be included in the group remembrance, an academy spokesman said Friday. The ceremony at the Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles airs at 8 p.m. EDT Sunday on CBS.

"It's an insult and it really seems typical of this youth-centric culture that has an extremely short attention span and panders to only a very narrow demographic" of young adults, Adam Klugman said.

In a statement, Emmy executive producer Ken Ehrlich explained his reasoning — a position that awards organizers often find themselves in when stars are absent from memorial segments.

"To a younger generation, Cory Monteith's portrayal of Finn Hudson (on 'Glee') was highly admired, and the producers felt that he should be included along with the four other individuals we have singled out," Ehrlich said.

For Adam Klugman, it's an indefensible move. His father's career spanned more than five decades and included lead-actor Emmys for acclaimed series "The Defenders" in 1961 and "The Odd Couple" in 1971 and '73. He died last December at age 90.

"What about the people who should be introduced to somebody like my father?" he said. "I don't mean to say anything disparaging about Cory, but he was a kid who had won no Emmys and it was a self-induced tragedy."

Online: http://www.emmys.org

You've read  of  free articles. Subscribe to continue.

Dear Reader,

About a year ago, I happened upon this statement about the Monitor in the Harvard Business Review – under the charming heading of “do things that don’t interest you”:

“Many things that end up” being meaningful, writes social scientist Joseph Grenny, “have come from conference workshops, articles, or online videos that began as a chore and ended with an insight. My work in Kenya, for example, was heavily influenced by a Christian Science Monitor article I had forced myself to read 10 years earlier. Sometimes, we call things ‘boring’ simply because they lie outside the box we are currently in.”

If you were to come up with a punchline to a joke about the Monitor, that would probably be it. We’re seen as being global, fair, insightful, and perhaps a bit too earnest. We’re the bran muffin of journalism.

But you know what? We change lives. And I’m going to argue that we change lives precisely because we force open that too-small box that most human beings think they live in.

The Monitor is a peculiar little publication that’s hard for the world to figure out. We’re run by a church, but we’re not only for church members and we’re not about converting people. We’re known as being fair even as the world becomes as polarized as at any time since the newspaper’s founding in 1908.

We have a mission beyond circulation, we want to bridge divides. We’re about kicking down the door of thought everywhere and saying, “You are bigger and more capable than you realize. And we can prove it.”

If you’re looking for bran muffin journalism, you can subscribe to the Monitor for $15. You’ll get the Monitor Weekly magazine, the Monitor Daily email, and unlimited access to CSMonitor.com.